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Keywords: working

Historical Items

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Item 23524

Woman working in Pepperell Mills, Biddeford, 1910

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1910 Location: Biddeford Media: Photographic print

Item 6158

Gannett Publishing Company workroom, Augusta, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1930 Location: Augusta Media: Photographic print

Item 6901

Sisters Working on Fancy Goods, Sabbathday Lake

Contributed by: United Society of Shakers Date: circa 1902 Location: New Gloucester Media: Slide from a glass-plate negative

Tax Records

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Item 32344

55 Alder Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Zafiris Vamvakias et als Style: Utilitarian Use: Mill - Cabinet Works

Item 57600

84 Hanover Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Cornelius A. Mannix Use: Granite Works

Item 59818

Assessor's Record, 69-85 Kennebec Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Gist Blair Use: Factory - Cabinet Works

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Working Women of the Old Port

Women at the turn of the 20th century were increasingly involved in paid work outside the home. For wage-earning women in the Old Port section of Portland, the jobs ranged from canning fish and vegetables to setting type. A study done in 1907 found many women did not earn living wages.

Exhibit

Putting Men to Work, Saving Trees

While many Mainers were averse to accepting federal relief money during the Great Depression of the 1930s, young men eagerly joined the Civilian Conservation Corps, one of President Franklin Roosevelt's most popular programs. The Maine Forest Service supervised the work of many of the camps.

Exhibit

Laboring in Maine

Workers in Maine have labored in factories, on farms, in the woods, on the water, among other locales. Many of Maine's occupations have been determined by the state's climate and geographical features.

Site Pages

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Site Page

City of Portland Department of Public Works

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Cyclone Work Cited

… Cyclone Work Cited “An Early Morning Cyclone.” The Hallowell Register, 4 Jan. 1896

Site Page

Highlighting Historical Hampden - Works Cited

Works Cited Eckstorm, Fannie Hardy. Indian Place Names of the Penobacot Valley and the Maine Coast. Orono: The University Press, 1941.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Working as a telephone operator in the 1940s
by Doris Tardy

Working as a telephone operator in 1946 was new and exciting, and challenging.

Story

Growing up in Lewiston
by Kathy Becvar

Growing up in Lewiston in the 1960s and 1970s.

Story

My education and work at THE Mercy
by Judy Harmon

Judy Harmon discussed X-Ray School, changing technology, and her 1960s jeep

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

The Not So Open Door

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Learn about immigration in the United States using primary sources from Maine Memory Network and the Library of Congress.

Lesson Plan

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: An American Studies Approach for Middle School

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was truly a man of his time and of his nation; this native of Portland, Maine and graduate of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine became an American icon. Lines from his poems intersperse our daily speech and the characters of his long narrative poems have become part of American myth. Longfellow's fame was international; scholars, politicians, heads-of-state and everyday people read and memorized his poems. Our goal is to show that just as Longfellow reacted to and participated in his times, so his poetry participated in shaping and defining American culture and literature. The following unit plan introduces and demonstrates an American Studies approach to the life and work of Longfellow. Because the collaborative work that forms the basis for this unit was partially responsible for leading the two of us to complete the American & New England Studies Masters program at University of Southern Maine, we returned there for a working definition of "American Studies approach" as it applies to the grade level classroom. Joe Conforti, who was director at the time we both went through the program, offered some useful clarifying comments and explanation. He reminded us that such a focus provides a holistic approach to the life and work of an author. It sets a work of literature in a broad cultural and historical context as well as in the context of the poet's life. The aim of an American Studies approach is to "broaden the context of a work to illuminate the American past" (Conforti) for your students. We have found this approach to have multiple benefits at the classroom and research level. It brings the poems and the poet alive for students and connects with other curricular work, especially social studies. When linked with a Maine history unit, it helps to place Portland and Maine in an historical and cultural context. It also provides an inviting atmosphere for the in-depth study of the mechanics of Longfellow's poetry. What follows is a set of lesson plans that form a unit of study. The biographical "anchor" that we have used for this unit is an out-of-print biography An American Bard: The story of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, by Ruth Langland Holberg, Thomas Y. Crowell & Company, c1963. Permission has been requested to make this work available as a downloadable file off this web page, but in the meantime, used copies are readily and cheaply available from various vendors. The poem we have chosen to demonstrate our approach is "Paul Revere's Ride." The worksheets were developed by Judy Donahue, the explanatory essays researched and written by the two of us, and our sources are cited below. We have also included a list of helpful links. When possible we have included helpful material in text format, or have supplied site links. Our complete unit includes other Longfellow poems with the same approach, but in the interest of time and space, they are not included. Please feel free to contact us with questions and comments.

Lesson Plan

The Elms - Stephen Longfellow's Gorham Farm

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
On April 3, 1761 Stephen Longfellow II signed the deed for the first 100 acre purchase of land that he would own in Gorham, Maine. His son Stephen III (Judge Longfellow) would build a home on that property which still stands to this day. Judge Longfellow would become one of the most prominent citizens in GorhamÂ’s history and one of the earliest influences on his grandson Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's work as a poet. This exhibit examines why the Longfellows arrived in Gorham, Judge Longfellow's role in the history of the town, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's vacations in the country which may have influenced his greatest work, and the remains of the Longfellow estate still standing in Gorham today.