Search Results

Keywords: trout

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 36 Showing 3 of 36

Item 57195

A few trout from Valley Brook, Strong, ca. 1905

Contributed by: Strong Historical Society Date: circa 1905 Location: Strong Media: Glass Negative

Item 74455

Trout Brook, Gray, 1913

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1913-08-23 Location: North Gray Media: Photographic print

Item 8538

Trout Brook Farm, Piscataquis County, 1915

Contributed by: Patten Lumbermen's Museum Date: 1915 Media: Photographic print

Architecture & Landscape

View All Showing 2 of 3 Showing 3 of 3

Item 110423

Butler residence, Northeast Harbor, 1987-2014

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1987–2014 Location: Mount Desert; Mount Desert Client: Gilbert Butler Architect: Patrick Chasse; Landscape Design Associates

Item 110424

Butler residence preliminary master plan, Mount Desert, 1996-2003

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1996–2003 Location: Mount Desert; Mount Desert Client: Gilbert Butler Architect: Patrick Chasse; Landscape Design Associates

Item 111336

Riverton Park, Portland, 1895

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1895 Location: Portland Client: unknown Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 9 Showing 3 of 9

Exhibit

Raising Fish

Mainers began propagating fish to stock ponds and lakes in the mid 19th century. The state got into the business in the latter part of the century, first concentrating on Atlantic salmon, then moving into raising other species for stocking rivers, lakes, and ponds.

Exhibit

Farm-yard Frames

Throughout New England, barns attached to houses are fairly common. Why were the buildings connected? What did farmers or families gain by doing this? The phenomenon was captured in the words of a children's song, "Big house, little house, back house, barn," (Thomas C. Hubka <em>Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn, the Connected Farm Buildings of New England,</em> University Press of New England, 1984.)

Exhibit

Hunting Season

Maine's ample woods historically provided numerous game animals and birds for hunters seeking food, fur, or hides. The promotion of hunting as tourism and concerns about conservation toward the end of the nineteenth century changed the nature of hunting in Maine.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 8 Showing 3 of 8

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Weighing the big trout, Mill Site, 1891

Weighing the big trout, Mill Site, 1891 Contributed by Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum (Houlton Museum) Description Camp on the…

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Online Items A few trout from Valley Brook, Strong, ca. 1905 Item 57195 infoStrong Historical Society Two fishing buddies display the…

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

… Winthrop Guild (1866-1958) take out a stringer of trout from a local brook. Harry, the son of James H.

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 3 Showing 3 of 3

Story

Cleaning Fish or How Grandfather and Grandmother got by
by Randy Randall

Grandfather and Grandmother subsisted on the fish Grandfather caught, not always legally.

Story

How Mom caught Dad
by Jane E. Woodman

How Ruth and Piney met in Wilton and started a life together

Story

Langdon Burton and the Cold, Wet Tourists
by Phil Tedrick

A father and son have their vacation experience totally changed by an encounter with a fisherman