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Keywords: teachers

Historical Items

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Item 69695

Mabel Hastie, Farmington State Teachers College, ca. 1954

Contributed by: Mantor Library at UMF Date: circa 1954 Location: Farmington Media: Photographic print

Item 25901

Good Will Farm teachers, 1919-1920

Contributed by: L.C. Bates Museum / Good Will-Hinckley Homes Date: circa 1920 Location: Fairfield Media: Photographic print

Item 14290

Good Will teachers, Fairfield, 1912

Contributed by: L.C. Bates Museum / Good Will-Hinckley Homes Date: 1912 Location: Fairfield Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

We Used to be "Normal": A History of F.S.N.S.

Farmington's Normal School -- a teacher-training facility -- opened in 1863 and, over the decades, offered academic programs that included such unique features as domestic and child-care training, and extra-curricular activities from athletics to music and theater.

Exhibit

Back to School

Public education has been a part of Maine since Euro-American settlement began to stabilize in the early eighteenth century. But not until the end of the nineteenth century was public education really compulsory in Maine.

Exhibit

Otisfield's One-Room Schoolhouses

Many of the one-room schoolhouses in Otisfield, constructed from 1839 through the early twentieth century, are featured here. The photos, most of which also show teachers and children, were taken between 1898 and 1998.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Portland Press Herald Glass Negative Collection - Wiscasset's Arctic Connection

… Maine Newspapers Explorer, scientist, author and teacher Donald B. MacMillan liked Wiscasset, a community of about 1,200 on the Sheepscot River…

Site Page

Portland Press Herald Glass Negative Collection - "Twenty Nationalities, But All Americans"

… citizenship before, this effort, led by veteran teacher Clara L. Soule, was the most visible and vigorous.

Site Page

Portland Press Herald Glass Negative Collection - Crime & Disaster - Page 1 of 2

Crime & Disaster Crime & Disaster A selection of photographs relating to crime & disaster in the Portland Press Herald Glass Plate Negative…

My Maine Stories

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Story

One View
by Karen Jelenfy

My life as an artist in Maine.

Story

From Brooklyn to Maine
by Samuel Gelber

Moving to Maine changed my artistic style, and I continue to learn from the landscape every day.

Story

I never thought I would work at a paper mill.
by Greg Bizier

I love science and managed the lab for International Paper's Otis Mill for 31 years.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: An American Studies Approach for Middle School

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was truly a man of his time and of his nation; this native of Portland, Maine and graduate of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine became an American icon. Lines from his poems intersperse our daily speech and the characters of his long narrative poems have become part of American myth. Longfellow's fame was international; scholars, politicians, heads-of-state and everyday people read and memorized his poems. Our goal is to show that just as Longfellow reacted to and participated in his times, so his poetry participated in shaping and defining American culture and literature. The following unit plan introduces and demonstrates an American Studies approach to the life and work of Longfellow. Because the collaborative work that forms the basis for this unit was partially responsible for leading the two of us to complete the American & New England Studies Masters program at University of Southern Maine, we returned there for a working definition of "American Studies approach" as it applies to the grade level classroom. Joe Conforti, who was director at the time we both went through the program, offered some useful clarifying comments and explanation. He reminded us that such a focus provides a holistic approach to the life and work of an author. It sets a work of literature in a broad cultural and historical context as well as in the context of the poet's life. The aim of an American Studies approach is to "broaden the context of a work to illuminate the American past" (Conforti) for your students. We have found this approach to have multiple benefits at the classroom and research level. It brings the poems and the poet alive for students and connects with other curricular work, especially social studies. When linked with a Maine history unit, it helps to place Portland and Maine in an historical and cultural context. It also provides an inviting atmosphere for the in-depth study of the mechanics of Longfellow's poetry. What follows is a set of lesson plans that form a unit of study. The biographical "anchor" that we have used for this unit is an out-of-print biography An American Bard: The story of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, by Ruth Langland Holberg, Thomas Y. Crowell & Company, c1963. Permission has been requested to make this work available as a downloadable file off this web page, but in the meantime, used copies are readily and cheaply available from various vendors. The poem we have chosen to demonstrate our approach is "Paul Revere's Ride." The worksheets were developed by Judy Donahue, the explanatory essays researched and written by the two of us, and our sources are cited below. We have also included a list of helpful links. When possible we have included helpful material in text format, or have supplied site links. Our complete unit includes other Longfellow poems with the same approach, but in the interest of time and space, they are not included. Please feel free to contact us with questions and comments.

Lesson Plan

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: "Christmas Bells" - A Lesson Plan for Middle School Students

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The words of this poem are more commonly known as the lyrics to a popular Christmas Carol of the same title. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote "Christmas Bells" in December of 1863 as the Civil War raged. It expresses his perpetual optimism and hope for the future of mankind. The poem's lively rhythm, simple rhyme and upbeat refrain have assured its popularity through the years.

Lesson Plan

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: "The Poet's Tale - The Birds of Killingworth" - A Lesson Plan for Middle School Students

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, English Language Arts, Social Studies
This poem is one of the numerous tales in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Tales of the Wayside Inn. The collection was published in three parts between 1863 and 1873. This series of long narrative poems were written by Longfellow during the most difficult personal time of his life. While mourning the tragic death of his second wife (Fanny Appleton Longfellow) he produced this ambitious undertaking. During this same period he translated Dante's Inferno from Italian to English. "The PoetÂ’s Tale" is a humorous poem with a strong environmental message which reflects Longfellow's Unitarian outlook on life.