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Keywords: nature

Historical Items

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Item 31701

Audubon Nature Center, Scarborough, ca. 1972

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum Date: circa 1972 Location: Scarborough Media: Photographic print

Item 17432

Audubon Nature Camp, Medomak, ca. 1939

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1939 Location: Medomak Media: Postcard

Item 81112

John D. Rockefeller Jr. letter to Charles K. Savage, Northeast Harbor, 1957

Contributed by: Mount Desert Island Historical Society Date: 1957 Location: Mount Desert; Mount Desert Island Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Tax Records

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Item 49985

Assessor's Record, 18-28 Elm Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Portland Natural History Society Use: Land only

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111663

York Institute, Saco, 1926

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1925–1926 Location: Saco Client: York Institute Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 116307

Fitzgerald house, Brighton, VT, 1888

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1888 Location: Brighton Client: George H. Fitzgerald Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Designing Acadia

For one hundred years, Acadia National Park has captured the American imagination and stood as the most recognizable symbol of Maine’s important natural history and identity. This exhibit highlights Maine Memory content relating to Acadia and Mount Desert Island.

Exhibit

Northern Threads: Colonial and 19th century fur trade

A vignette in "Northern Threads: Two centuries of dress at Maine Historical Society Part 1," this fur trade mini-exhibition discusses the environmental and economic impact of the fur trade in Maine through the 19th century.

Exhibit

Walter Wyman and River Power

Walter Wyman's vision to capture the power of Maine's rivers to produce electricity led to the formation of Central Maine Power Co. and to a struggle within the state over what should happen to the power produced by the state's natural resources.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Cottagers

… cottagers and visitors who were inclined toward nature and artistic or intellectual pursuits. Overall, their homes and hotels were less extravagant…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Inns

… Off-season, Ted worked in the woods and turned natural materials into items to sell: “My dad used to do quillwork when I was a boy – and I always…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Beginnings

… traditional knowledge, language, and other natural sciences create a picture of Wabanaki life here before the arrival of Europeans.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Restoring the Penobscot River
by John Banks

My role as the Director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation

Story

Swimming with Jellyfish
by Cathy. L

At the age of 19 Cathy attended an Audubon Camp at Hog Island.

Story

Water is Music
by P Leone

Throughout her life water has played an important part

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Why is Maine the Pine Tree State?

Grade Level: K-2 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students in early elementary grades a foundation for identifying the recognizable animals and natural resources of Maine. In this lesson, students will learn about and identify animals and plants significant to the state, and will identify what types of environments are best suited to different types of plant and animal life. Students will have the opportunity to put their own community wildlife into a large-scale perspective.