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Keywords: men

Historical Items

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Item 22534

Remarkable Old Men of Alfred, 1903

Contributed by: Alfred Historical Committee Date: 1903-06-26 Location: Alfred Media: Photographic print

Item 13499

Medal, Improved Order of Red Men

Contributed by: Fryeburg Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Fryeburg Media: Metal

Item 13658

Improved Order of Red Men charter, Fryeburg, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Fryeburg Historical Society Date: circa 1930 Location: Fryeburg Media: Poster, ink on paper

Tax Records

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Item 45335

Assessor's Record, 131-133 Danforth Street (rear), Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Home for Aged Men Use: Stable

Item 45336

Assessor's Record, 131-133 Danforth Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Home for Aged Men Use: Garage

Item 46241

127-129 Danforth Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Home for Aged Men Use: Dwelling - Two family

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Putting Men to Work, Saving Trees

While many Mainers were averse to accepting federal relief money during the Great Depression of the 1930s, young men eagerly joined the Civilian Conservation Corps, one of President Franklin Roosevelt's most popular programs. The Maine Forest Service supervised the work of many of the camps.

Exhibit

South Portland's Wartime Shipbuilding

Two shipyards in South Portland, built quickly in 1941 to construct cargo ships for the British and Americans, produced nearly 270 ships in two and a half years. Many of those vessels bore the names of notable Mainers.

Exhibit

Debates Over Suffrage

While numerous Mainers worked for and against woman suffrage in the state in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, some also worked on the national level, seeking a federal amendment to allow women the right to vote

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Shipbuilders, Sailors and Whaling Men

Shipbuilders, Sailors and Whaling Men The Drews and the Pierces Among the first settlers to arrive in what is now Hallowell were shipbuilders from…

Site Page

Swan's Island: Six miles east of ordinary - Draining Baird's Quarry

The men are trying out the pump they rigged up on the raft before setting it in place to pump out the quarry.

Site Page

Swan's Island: Six miles east of ordinary - Draining Baird's Quarry

and Isaac Stinson in a boat in the Quarry Pond, Minturn, Swan's Island. The men are setting up the hose to drain the pond.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Being a woman Union member was a challenge in the paper mill
by Cindy Bennett

I worked in the paper mills and for the Union during the 1987 strike.

Story

USCG Boot Camp Experience, Vietnam War era
by Peter S. Morgan, Jr.

"Letters to the Wall" Memorial Day

Story

The only letter to survive World War II
by Cyrene Slegona

Only one of many letters my father sent to his wife remained after he came home from World War II.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow and Dickens: The Story of a Trans-Atlantic Friendship

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
What if you don't teach American Studies but you want to connect to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in meaningful ways? One important connection is Henry's friendship with Charles Dickens. There are many great resources about Dickens and if you teach his novels, you probably already know his biography and the chronology of his works. No listing for his association with Henry appears on most websites and few references will be found in texts. However, journals and diary entries and especially letters reveal a friendship that allowed their mutual respect to influence Henry's work.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries: The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?