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Keywords: maple syrup

Historical Items

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Item 28068

H. A. Titcomb Maple Syrup Company can, Farmington, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Farmington Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Farmington Media: Tin can

Item 28074

H. A. Titcomb Maple Syrup Company bottle, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Farmington Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Farmington Media: Glass bottle

Item 16479

Aluminum Maple Syrup Carafe, c. 1900

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum (Houlton Museum) Date: circa 1900 Location: Houlton; Chicago Media: Aluminum

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Maine Sweets: Confections and Confectioners

From chocolate to taffy, Mainers are inventive with our sweet treats. In addition to feeding our sweet tooth, it's also an economic driver for the state.

Exhibit

Maine Eats: the food revolution starts here

From Maine's iconic lobsters, blueberries, potatoes, apples, and maple syrup, to local favorites like poutine, baked beans, red hot dogs, Italian sandwiches, and Whoopie Pies, Maine's identity and economy are inextricably linked to food. Sourcing food, preparing food, and eating food are all part of the heartbeat of Maine's culture and economy. Now, a food revolution is taking us back to our roots in Maine: to the traditional sources, preparation, and pleasures of eating food that have sustained Mainers for millennia.

Exhibit

A Focus on Trees

Maine has some 17 million acres of forest land. But even on a smaller, more local scale, trees have been an important part of the landscape. In many communities, tree-lined commercial and residential streets are a dominant feature of photographs of the communities.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Farming in the Skowhegan Area

Maine blueberries still sell well and the maple syrup is exceptional. Many small farms are gone and that is the sad story indeed.

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Brief History

The syrup was a staple sugar source to early inhabitants; it is believed local Indians, such as Pierpole, taught the residents how to boil sap into…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Agriculture

… Titcomb Syrup Bottle The Titcomb Family made maple syrup for over 200 years. Farmington Historical Society The greatest growth of Farmington took…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity

Story

Ah, les Fameuse Ployes!
by Alain Ouellette

Growing up in an Acadian French family and eating ployes