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Keywords: last

Historical Items

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Item 22159

Mousam River Near Indian's Last Leap, Springvale, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Sanford Media: Print from Glass Negative

Item 16436

Indian's Last Leap, Springvale

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Springvale Media: Print from Glass Negative

Item 111311

Wooden shoe last, ca. 1845

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1845 Media: wood, rope

Tax Records

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Item 51647

Assessor's Record, 38 Federal Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Leo Emilia Use: Garage

Item 58128

88-90 Holm Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Eva R. Gailoy Use: Dwelling - Single House

Item 51645

38 Federal Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Leo Emilia Use: Apartments

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 109604

New offices in Fitz Bros. Last Factory, Auburn, 1897

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1897 Location: Auburn Client: Fitz Bros. Architect: Coombs, Gibbs, and Wilkinson Architects

Item 109605

Stair Tower for Fitz Bros. Last Factory, Auburn, 1897

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1897 Location: Auburn Client: Fitz Bros. Architect: Coombs, Gibbs, and Wilkinson Architects

Item 109478

Residence of Messrs. Blake and Ham, corner of Main and High Streets, Lewiston, 1885

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1885 Location: Lewiston; Lewiston Client: Blake Architect: George M. Coombs

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Fallen Heroes: Last of the Jewish WWII Veterans

Listen to recordings from the last of the World War II Jewish veterans.

Exhibit

Launch of the 'Doris Hamlin'

The Doris Hamlin, a four-masted schooner built at the Frye-Flynn Shipyard in Harrington, was one of the last vessels launched there, marking the decline of a once vigorous shipbuilding industry in Washington County.

Exhibit

Luxurious Leisure

From the last decades of the nineteenth century through about the 1920s, vacationers were attracted to large resort hotels that promised a break from the noise, crowds, and pressures of an ever-urbanizing country.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Solid Foundations - Lasting Legacies

Solid Foundations - Lasting Legacies Hallowell celebrates proudly!Hubbard Free Library Hallowell Celebrates It 250th Anniversary! The City…

Site Page

Moosehead Messenger

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Corn Canning Industry

The season lasted a mere three weeks. Franklin Farm Products Cooperative, established in 1929 was the last cannery to disappear from Farmington’s…

My Maine Stories

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Story

The New Normal
by Darlene Reardon

COVID-19 Poem

Story

How Mon-Oncle France came to Les-États
by Michael Parent

How Mon-Oncle France came to the United States.

Story

Passing the time during the Pandemic
by Don V

Building a strip canoe

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow and the American Sonnet

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Traditionally the Petrarchan sonnet as used by Francesco Petrarch was a 14 line lyric poem using a pattern of hendecasyllables and a strict end-line rhyme scheme; the first twelve lines followed one pattern and the last two lines another. The last two lines were the "volta" or "turn" in the poem. When the sonnet came to the United States sometime after 1775, through the work of Colonel David Humphreys, Longfellow was one of the first to write widely in this form which he adapted to suit his tone. Since 1900 poets have modified and experimented with the traditional traits of the sonnet form.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Slave's Dream"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
In December of 1842 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Poems on Slavery was published. "The Slave's Dream" is one of eight anti-slavery poems in the collection. A beautifully crafted and emotionally moving poem, it mesmerizes the reader with the last thoughts of an African King bound to slavery, as he lies dying in a field of rice. The 'landscape of his dreams' include the lordly Niger flowing, his green-eyed Queen, the Caffre huts and all of the sights and sounds of his homeland until at last 'Death illuminates his Land of Sleep.'

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The American Wilderness? How 19th Century American Artists Viewed the Separation Of Civilization and Nature

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
When European settlers began coming to the wilderness of North America, they did not have a vision that included changing their lifestyle. The plan was to set up self-contained communities where their version of European life could be lived. In the introduction to The Crucible, Arthur Miller even goes as far as saying that the Puritans believed the American forest to be the last stronghold of Satan on this Earth. When Roger Chillingworth shows up in The Scarlet Letter's second chapter, he is welcomed away from life with "the heathen folk" and into "a land where iniquity is searched out, and punished in the sight of rulers and people." In fact, as history's proven, they believed that the continent could be changed to accommodate their interests. Whether their plans were enacted in the name of God, the King, or commerce and economics, the changes always included – and still do to this day - the taming of the geographic, human, and animal environments that were here beforehand. It seems that this has always been an issue that polarizes people. Some believe that the landscape should be left intact as much as possible while others believe that the world will inevitably move on in the name of progress for the benefit of mankind. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby – a book which many feel is one of the best portrayals of our American reality - the narrator, Nick Carraway, looks upon this progress with cynicism when he ends his narrative by pondering the transformation of "the fresh green breast of a new world" that the initial settlers found on the shores of the continent into a modern society that unsettlingly reminds him of something out of a "night scene by El Greco." Philosophically, the notions of progress, civilization, and scientific advancement are not only entirely subjective, but also rest upon the belief that things are not acceptable as they are. Europeans came here hoping for a better life, and it doesn't seem like we've stopped looking. Again, to quote Fitzgerald, it's the elusive green light and the "orgiastic future" that we've always hoped to find. Our problem has always been our stoic belief system. We cannot seem to find peace in the world either as we've found it or as someone else may have envisioned it. As an example, in Miller's The Crucible, his Judge Danforth says that: "You're either for this court or against this court." He will not allow for alternative perspectives. George W. Bush, in 2002, said that: "You're either for us or against us. There is no middle ground in the war on terror." The frontier -- be it a wilderness of physical, religious, or political nature -- has always frightened Americans. As it's portrayed in the following bits of literature and artwork, the frontier is a doomed place waiting for white, cultured, Europeans to "fix" it. Anything outside of their society is not just different, but unacceptable. The lesson plan included will introduce a few examples of 19th century portrayal of the American forest as a wilderness that people feel needs to be hesitantly looked upon. Fortunately, though, the forest seems to turn no one away. Nature likes all of its creatures, whether or not the favor is returned. While I am not providing actual activities and daily plans, the following information can serve as a rather detailed explanation of things which can combine in any fashion you'd like as a group of lessons.