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Keywords: invasion

Historical Items

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Item 1281

Benedict Arnold letter, along the Dead River, 1775

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1775 Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 1280

Benedict Arnold letter to Capt. Farnsworth, 1775

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1775-09-29 Location: Augusta Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 102559

Remember Belgium propaganda poster, ca. 1918

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1918 Media: Lithograph

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Liberty Threatened: Maine in 1775

At Lexington and Concord, on April 19, 1775, British troops attempted to destroy munitions stored by American colonists. The battles were the opening salvos of the American Revolution. Shortly, the conflict would erupt in Maine.

Exhibit

The British capture and occupation of Eastport 1814-1818

The War of 1812 ended in December 1814, but Eastport continued to be under British control for another four years. Eastport was the last American territory occupied by the British from the War of 1812 to be returned to the United States. Except for the brief capture of two Aleutian Islands in Alaska by the Japanese in World War II, it was the last time since 2018 that United States soil was occupied by a foreign government.

Exhibit

Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In

Adorning oneself to look one's "best" has varied over time, gender, economic class, and by event. Adornments suggest one's sense of identity and one's intent to stand out or fit in.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Contact Us

Contact Us Laura Richter Skowhegan Area Middle School lrichter@msad54.org 207-474-3339 http://www.msad54.org/sams

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Farming in the Skowhegan Area

Farming in the Skowhegan Area Nettie P. Rowell of Cornville X by Dalton Landry and Lucas London Farming in Maine has been a rough and rocky…

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Skowhegan Then and Now

Skowhegan Then and Now   Our movie on Skowhegan Then and Now Bicycle ClubItem Contributed bySkowhegan History House This movie was part of…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Why environmental advocacy is critical for making baskets
by Jennifer Sapiel Neptune

My advocacy work for the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance

Story

Wikpiyik: The Basket Tree
by Darren Ranco

Countering the Emerald Ash Borer with Wabanaki Ecological Knowledge

Story

2020 Sheltering in Place Random Notes During COVID-19
by Phyllis Merriam, LCSW

Sheltering-in-Place personal experiences in mid-coast Maine (Rockland) during March and April 2020

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.