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Keywords: icehouse

Historical Items

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Item 29974

North Yarmouth farm, ca. 1900

Contributed by: North Yarmouth Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: North Yarmouth Media: Photographic print

Item 6407

Kennebec River and ice houses, Richmond, ca. 1883

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1883 Location: Richmond Media: Ink on paper

Item 30857

French Farm, Turner, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Turner Museum and Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Turner Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Ice: A Maine Commodity

Maine's frozen rivers and lakes provided an economic opportunity. The state shipped thousands of tons of ice to ports along the East Coast and to the West Indies that workers had cut and packed in sawdust for shipment or later use.

Exhibit

Maine Eats: the food revolution starts here

From Maine's iconic lobsters, blueberries, potatoes, apples, and maple syrup, to local favorites like poutine, baked beans, red hot dogs, Italian sandwiches, and Whoopie Pies, Maine's identity and economy are inextricably linked to food. Sourcing food, preparing food, and eating food are all part of the heartbeat of Maine's culture and economy. Now, a food revolution is taking us back to our roots in Maine: to the traditional sources, preparation, and pleasures of eating food that have sustained Mainers for millennia.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Ice Harvesting on Cascade Pond ~ A Family Affair

The icehouse was behind the family home. Arthur Moore Jr, the son of the last operator, recounted the trials and tribulations of the business.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Ice Cutting and Ice Houses on the Bombahook

There were three icehouses in Hallowell located on Summer Street, the Vaughan Stream, and where the Hallowell boat landing is today.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Ice Harvesting on Cascade Pond

The icehouse was behind the family home. Arthur Moore Jr, the son of the last operator recounted the trials and tribulations of the business.