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Keywords: hand forged

Historical Items

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Item 16809

Socket gouge

Contributed by: Davistown Museum Date: circa 1850 Media: Forged iron, welded cast steel, iron ferrule

Item 10438

Primitive iron hammer

Contributed by: Davistown Museum Date: 1620 - 1675 Media: Forged iron and wood

Item 10437

Gutter adze, ca. 1650

Contributed by: Davistown Museum Date: circa 1650 Media: Forged bog iron

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Biddeford, Saco and the Textile Industry

The largest textile factory in the country reached seven stories up on the banks of the Saco River in 1825, ushering in more than a century of making cloth in Biddeford and Saco. Along with the industry came larger populations and commercial, retail, social, and cultural growth.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine's Swedish Colony, July 23, 1870 - A Photo Essay of Hand Tools Found in the Swedish Colony

c.1940 Item 19557 infoStockholm Historical Society Iron tongs used for making nails or other metal products in a forge.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Charles K. Savage (1903-1979): The View from Asticou - Page 4 of 6

Rockefeller, Jr. was forged in 1953 when Charles learned of the clearcutting of trees near Hadlock Pond above Asticou and on land bordering Route 198.

Site Page

Guilford, Maine - Modern History: 1966 to Present

… indicators, the resilient people of Guilford kept forging new roads and in fact paved some that had been only gravel for over a century.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Celebrity's Picture: Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.