Search Results

Keywords: hand colored

Historical Items

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Item 102387

County fair pulling contest, Farmington, 1932

Contributed by: Stanley Museum on deposit at Maine Historical Society Date: 1932 Location: Farmington Media: Lantern slide, hand colored

Item 16913

Hand-colored shot of Blue Hill Bay

Contributed by: Blue Hill Public Library Date: circa 1920 Location: Blue Hill Media: Postcard

Item 102367

Stanley Hill spring, Kingfield, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Stanley Museum on deposit at Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1910 Location: Kingfield Media: Lantern slide

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Lt. Charles Bridges: Getting Ahead in the Army

Sgt. Charles Bridges of Co. B of the 2nd Maine Infantry was close to the end of his two years' enlistment in early 1863 when he took advantage of an opportunity for advancement by seeking and getting a commission as an officer in the 3rd Regiment U.S. (Colored) Volunteers.

Exhibit

World War I and the Maine Experience

With a long history of patriotism and service, Maine experienced the war in a truly distinct way. Its individual experiences tell the story of not only what it means to be an American, but what it means to be from Maine during the war to end all wars.

Exhibit

Mural mystery in Westport Island's Cornelius Tarbox, Jr. House

The Cornelius Tarbox, Jr. House, a well-preserved Greek Revival house on Westport Island, has a mystery contained within--a panoramic narrative mural. The floor-to-ceiling mural contains eight painted panels that create a colorful coastal seascape which extends through the front hallway and up the stairwell. The name of the itinerant painter has been lost over time, can you help us solve the mystery of who he or she was?

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Clothing Collection - 1870-1890 - Page 3 of 4

The garment is trimmed throughout with colorful hand embroidered floral sprays and a deep chenille bobble fringe edges the sleeves and basque.

Site Page

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag - Catch of the Day: Clamming and Lobstering - Page 1 of 4

There is no quick way to harvest clams; only hand tools or hands are allowed by the state. The process of harvesting clams hasn’t changed over the…

Site Page

Highlighting Historical Hampden - Buttons

Some white, some brown, some colorful- many shapes, many sizes, many colors. Made of vegetable ivory, bakelite, wood, metal, hard rubber, horn…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Co-founding Halcyon Yarn and learning to weave
by Hector Jaeger

Moving to Maine, Halcyon Yarn, and rediscovering the joy of weaving

Story

Rug Hooking Project with a Story
by Marilyn Weymouth Seguin

My grandmother taught me the Maine craft of rug hooking when I was a child.

Story

Tapestry, Seine Twine and Burlesque
by Barbara Burns

My work as a tapestry artist and dancer in Maine.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.