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Keywords: enterprise

Historical Items

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Item 16354

'Lisbon Enterprise' fire article, 1901

Contributed by: Lisbon Historical Society Date: 1901-04-08 Location: Lisbon Falls Media: Newspaper

Item 131

The "Boxer" and "Enterprise," Monhegan, 1831

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1813-09-05 Location: Monhegan Media: Watercolor on paper

Item 16981

Tobacco cutter, Haynesville, c. 1875

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: circa 1875 Location: Haynesville; Philadelphia Media: Iron

Tax Records

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Item 54489

Assessor's Record, 293 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Hersey Corporation Use: Vulcanizing Room

Item 54512

Assessor's Record, 343-349 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Miles B. Mank Motor Car Company Use: Oil House

Item 54513

Assessor's Record, 343-349 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Miles B. Mank Motor Car Company Use: Runway

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Enemies at Sea, Companions in Death

Lt. William Burrows and Commander Samuel Blyth, commanders of the USS Enterprise and the HMS Boxer, led their ships and crews in Battle in Muscongus Bay on Sept. 5, 1813. The American ship was victorious, but both captains were killed. Portland staged a large and regal joint burial.

Exhibit

"We are growing to be somewhat cosmopolitan..." Waterville, 1911

Between 1870 and 1911, Waterville more than doubled in size, becoming a center of manufacturing, transportation, and the retail trade and offering a variety of entertainments for its residents.

Exhibit

Jameson & Wotton Wharf, Friendship

Since 1897, the Jameson & Wotton Wharf in Friendship has been an important addition to the community on Muscongus Bay. The wharf, which is accessible at all tides, was a steamboat stop for many years, as well as important to the lobster business.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Swan's Island: Six miles east of ordinary - IV. Transitions and troubles: Private enterprise shoulders an island’s needs

IV. Transitions and troubles: Private enterprise shoulders an island’s needs Left with no reliable connection to the mainland and few secure sources…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Our Journey Home

The qualities they brought -- a spirit of enterprise, a respect for education and a recognition of the importance of living by example -- were the…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Solid Foundations - Lasting Legacies

The qualities settlers brought -- a spirit of enterprise, a respect for education and a recognition of the importance of living by example -- were…

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?