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Keywords: crown

Historical Items

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Item 14745

White Crown Brand potato bag, Presque Isle, c. 1970

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum Date: circa 1970 Location: Presque Isle Media: Paper

Item 14946

Blue Crown Potatoes bag, Presque Isle, c. 1980

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum Date: circa 1980 Location: Presque Isle Media: Paper

Item 35114

Thacher-Goodale House, Saco, ca. 1912

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: circa 1912 Location: Saco Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Big Timber: the Mast Trade

Britain was especially interested in occupying Maine during the Colonial era to take advantage of the timber resources. The tall, straight, old growth white pines were perfect for ships' masts to help supply the growing Royal Navy.

Exhibit

Back to School

Public education has been a part of Maine since Euro-American settlement began to stabilize in the early eighteenth century. But not until the end of the nineteenth century was public education really compulsory in Maine.

Exhibit

The British capture and occupation of Eastport 1814-1818

The War of 1812 ended in December 1814, but Eastport continued to be under British control for another four years. Eastport was the last American territory occupied by the British from the War of 1812 to be returned to the United States. Except for the brief capture of two Aleutian Islands in Alaska by the Japanese in World War II, it was the last time since 2018 that United States soil was occupied by a foreign government.

Site Pages

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Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Fashion in Bangor, 1865

… off the rim entire and leave nothing but the crown and a visor." He suggested that women's fashions changed when men went off to the Civil War.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Dummer House

… learned of the successes and honor that have here crowned his life. We also know of the charm and happiness in the social life of the rapidly…

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Gorham L. Boynton, Bangor, ca. 1867

… him very large not very tall wears usually a low crowned straw hat drab or yellow pants & vest sometimes a black coat & sometimes dark or brown…

My Maine Stories

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Story

A Note from a Maine-American
by William Dow Turner

With 7 generations before statehood, and 5 generations since, Maine DNA carries on.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?