Search Results

Keywords: courage

Historical Items

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Item 78

Battling a Northeaster

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1947-03-03 Location: Cape Elizabeth Media: Photographic print

Item 22712

Harold Berry, Houlton, 1919

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: 1919 Location: Houlton Media: Photographic print

Item 34463

"Gordon" naming ceremony program, Newport News, Virginia, 1996

Contributed by: Lincoln Historical Society Date: 1993 Location: Newport News; Mogadishu; Lincoln Media: Lithograph

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Student Exhibit: Benedict Arnold's March Through Skowhegan

Benedict Arnold arrived in Skowhegan on October 4th, 1775, and it was here that Arnold received his first offer of help from the colonists. Joseph Weston and his sons helped Benedict Arnold and his army cross over the Skowhegan Falls, but Joseph later got a severe cold from exposure and died of a fever on Oct.16th. His sons went back to the family home along the Kennebec for they were the first family to settle in Old Canaan or what is now Skowhegan.

Exhibit

Shepard Cary: Lumberman, Legislator, Leader and Legend

Shepard Cary (1805-1866) was one of the leading -- and wealthiest -- residents of early Aroostook County. He was a lumberman, merchant, mill operator, and legislator.

Exhibit

Margaret Chase Smith: A Historic Candidacy

When she announced her candidacy for President in January 1964, three-term Republican Senator Margaret Chase Smith became the first woman to seek the nomination of one of the two major political parties.

Site Pages

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Site Page

National Archives at Boston

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Guilford, Maine - Veterans Tributes - Page 1 of 2

Both served with great distinction and courage. Their names - Louis Wilbur Trafton and Mattie Anna Pinette Sgt.

Site Page

Early Maine Photography - Famous People - Page 2 of 3

Kennedy in Profiles in Courage, have praised the conviction and foresight of this Maine senator’s decision.

My Maine Stories

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Story

The Point
by Norma K. Salway

In the summer, on the eastern shore of Songo, kids dove from a leaning tree

Story

The gift of a necklace
by Parivash Rohani

When I was born my grandmother gave me a part of a Baha’i prayer for protection.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.