Search Results

Keywords: cooking

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 453 Showing 3 of 453

Item 74768

Cooking school poster proof, 1964

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1964 Media: Ink on paper

Item 5644

Cooking class, Portland High School, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 103632

Food baskets, Portland, ca. 1934

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media Date: circa 1934 Location: Portland Media: Glass Negative

Tax Records

View All Showing 2 of 49 Showing 3 of 49

Item 85905

Cook property, E. side Island Avenue, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Abbie G. Cook Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 85168

Cook property, S. Side Ocean Avenue, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Abbie Geary Cook Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 89996

Cook property, West End Harrington Avenue, Long Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Clarence E. Cook Use: Summer Dwelling

Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 36 Showing 3 of 36

Exhibit

Cooks and Cookees: Lumber Camp Legends

Stories and tall tales abound concerning cooks and cookees -- important persons in any lumber camp, large or small.

Exhibit

How Sweet It Is

Desserts have always been a special treat. For centuries, Mainers have enjoyed something sweet as a nice conclusion to a meal or celebrate a special occasion. But many things have changed over the years: how cooks learn to make desserts, what foods and tools were available, what was important to people.

Exhibit

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 349 Showing 3 of 349

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Back (l-r): Lewis Brackley, Lawrence Cook, Glen Brackley, Laurence Voter, Wendell Cook, Ross Richards, Merlon Kingsley.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Thaxter Cook, * Thaxter Cook Back row: * Col. James S Nash, * George T Jacobs, * Sylvester Vaughan, * Samuel Gilman, * Alden Gilman, Mrs.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Groups, Clubs & Organizations - Page 1 of 3

Back (l-r): Lewis Brackley, Lawrence Cook, Glen Brackley, Laurence Voter, Wendell Cook, Ross Richards, Merlon Kingsley.Item Contributed byStrong…

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 28 Showing 3 of 28

Story

Ramen Making
by Ayumi Horie

Ramen Making is about family, cooking, pottery, and what it means to make a life through one's hands

Story

Portland cuisine supports health in West Africa
by Maria Cushing

I present Portuguese inspired food to fundraise for Amigos de Mente

Story

Finding and cooking fiddleheads with my parents
by Brian J. Theriault

My father has been picking and eating fiddleheads almost all his life, Mom prepares and stores them

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 14 Showing 3 of 14

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine's Acadian Community: "Evangeline," Le Grand Dérangement, and Cultural Survival

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce students to the history of the forced expulsion of thousands of people from Acadia, the Romantic look back at the tragedy in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous epic poem Evangeline and the heroine's adoption as an Acadian cultural figure, and Maine's Acadian community today, along with their relations with Acadian New Brunswick and Nova Scotia residents and others in the Acadian Diaspora. Students will read and discuss primary documents, compare and contrast Le Grand Dérangement to other forced expulsions in Maine history and discuss the significance of cultural survival amidst hardships brought on by treaties, wars, and legislation.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Sporting Maine

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Health Education & Physical Education, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce students to myriad communities in Maine, past and present, through the universal lens of sports and group activities. Students will explore and understand the history of many of Maine’s recreational pastimes, what makes Maine the ideal location for some outdoor sports, and how communities have come together through team activities throughout Maine’s history.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

What Remains: Learning about Maine Populations through Burial Customs

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
This lesson plan will give students an overview of how burial sites and gravestone material culture can assist historians and archaeologists in discovering information about people and migration over time. Students will learn how new scholarship can help to dispel harmful archaeological myths, look into the roles of religion and ethnicity in early Maine and New England immigrant and colonial settlements, and discover how to track changes in population and social values from the 1600s to early 1900s based on gravestone iconography and epitaphs.