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Keywords: clam bait

Historical Items

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Item 29399

John Kilbourn Paper, Scarborough, 1852

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum Date: 1852 Location: Scarborough Media: Ink on paper

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Item 29401

Protection of clams in the Town of Scarborough, 1853

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum Date: 1853-02-18 Location: Scarborough Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

Maine Eats: the food revolution starts here

From Maine's iconic lobsters, blueberries, potatoes, apples, and maple syrup, to local favorites like poutine, baked beans, red hot dogs, Italian sandwiches, and Whoopie Pies, Maine's identity and economy are inextricably linked to food. Sourcing food, preparing food, and eating food are all part of the heartbeat of Maine's culture and economy. Now, a food revolution is taking us back to our roots in Maine: to the traditional sources, preparation, and pleasures of eating food that have sustained Mainers for millennia.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag - Catch of the Day: Clamming and Lobstering - Page 1 of 4

Clams were shucked (meat cut from the shell), salted, and barreled in fish houses on the flats of Blue Point.

Site Page

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag - Catch of the Day: Clamming and Lobstering - Page 3 of 4

… used them for crop fertilizer and fish bait, as well as food for themselves; early settlers considered lobsters food for servants and paupers. Some…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Catching live bait with Grandfather
by Randy Randall

We never bought live bait for fishing. Grandfather caught all the minnows and shiners we needed.

Story

Cleaning Fish or How Grandfather and Grandmother got by
by Randy Randall

Grandfather and Grandmother subsisted on the fish Grandfather caught, not always legally.