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Keywords: casks

Historical Items

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Item 26639

J. A. Creighton Store, Thomaston, ca. 1870

Contributed by: Thomaston Historical Society Date: circa 1870 Location: Thomaston Media: Photographic print

Item 25748

Main Street, Thomaston, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Penobscot Marine Museum Date: circa 1910 Location: Thomaston Media: Glass Negative

Item 27836

J. A. Creighton Store, Knox Street, Thomaston, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Thomaston Historical Society Date: circa 1910 Location: Thomaston Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Extracting Wealth

Maine's natural resources -- granite, limestone and slate in particular -- along with its excellent ports made it a leader in mining and production of the valuable building materials. Stone work also attracted numerous skilled immigrants.

Exhibit

Popham Colony

George Popham and a group of fellow Englishmen arrived at the mouth of the Kennebec River, hoping to trade with Native Americans, find gold and other valuable minerals, and discover a Northwest passage. In 18 months, the fledgling colony was gone.

Exhibit

Maine Streets: The Postcard View

Photographers from the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Co. of Belfast traveled throughout the state, especially in small communities, taking images for postcards. Many of these images, taken in the first three decades of the twentieth century, capture Main Streets on the brink of modernity.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Shipping

… of rum 6 pounds of butter 1 barrel of molasses 1 cask of raisins 1 cask of oil 1 bundle of bed springs 54 1/2 of shingles 15in 73 feet of boards…

Site Page

Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea - Henry Knox: Lime Works

… and September 1805, Knox notes the sale of 3,000 casks of lime and the purchase of almost 3,800 lime casks.

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - A Brief History of the Skowhegan Area

The casks that contained dried fish, peas and other staples were cracked open and the water caused much of the food to spoil.