Search Results

Keywords: Wabanaki

Historical Items

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Item 80733

Egg Basket, Wabanaki, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1900 Media: Ash splints, sweetgrass, dye

Item 80734

Comb basket, Wabanaki, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1900 Media: Ash splints, sweetgrass, dye

Item 80732

Napkin ring, Wabanaki, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1900 Media: Ash splints, sweetgrass

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 116293

James P. Baxter house, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Client: James P. Baxter Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Gluskap of the Wabanaki

Creation and other cultural tales are important to framing a culture's beliefs and values -- and passing those on. The Wabanaki -- Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot -- Indians of Maine and Nova Scotia tell stories of a cultural hero/creator, a giant who lived among them and who promised to return.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Exhibit

CODE RED: Climate, Justice & Natural History Collections

Explore topics around climate change by reuniting collections from one of the nation's earliest natural history museums, the Portland Society of Natural History. The exhibition focuses on how museums collect, and the role of humans in creating changes in society, climate, and biodiversity.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Wabanaki Today

"Wabanaki Today Wabanaki Today The Indian encampments are no longer part of the cultural or physical makeup of Mount Desert Island; however the…"

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - In the beginning, there were the Wabanaki…

"In the beginning, there were the WabanakiWabanaki encampment, ca. 1000 BCEAbbe Museum Nearly 500 years ago, Wabanakis spotted the first…"

Site Page

Beyond Borders - Mapping Maine and the Northeast Boundary - Wabanaki Agency in the Proprietor Records - Page 2 of 5

"Even as Wabanaki people strove to incorporate settlers into their Indigenous cultural and economic systems, the settlers sought their signatures and…"

My Maine Stories

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Story

Wabanaki Sovereignty
by Mali Obomsawin and Lokotah Sanborn

Bomazeen Land Trust, renewing and resuming Wabanaki caretaking and stewardship roles

Story

A New Beginning for Wabanaki Land Relationships
by John Banks

Wabanaki leadership in land stewardship

Story

Wabanaki Fashion
by Decontie & Brown

Keeping the spirit and memories of our ancestors alive through fashion and creativity

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between the Wabanaki Tribes/Nations and the State of Maine. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by taking a close look at documents relating to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 (MICSA) and the issues that preceded and have followed the Act.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.