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Keywords: Villages

Historical Items

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Item 78871

Village of Somesville, ca. 1918

Contributed by: Mount Desert Island Historical Society Date: circa 1918 Location: Mount Desert Media: Postcard

Item 6524

Popham Beach, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1930 Location: Popham Beach Media: Photoprint

Item 65252

Reunion program cover, Surry Village School, 1993

Contributed by: Surry Historical Society Date: 1993-08-14 Location: Surry Media: Ink on paper

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 110142

Redbank Village buildings, South Portland, 1942

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1942 Location: South Portland Client: Federal Public Housing Authority Architect: John Calvin Stevens John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 110145

Redbank Village buildings, South Portland, 1942-1946

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1942–1946 Location: South Portland Client: Federal Public Housing Authority Architect: John Howard Stevens John Calvin Stevens II Architects

Item 110146

Redbank Village buildings, South Portland, 1942

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1942 Location: South Portland Client: Federal Public Housing Authority Architect: John Howard Stevens John Calvin Stevens II Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Indians at the Centennial

Passamaquoddy Indians from Washington County traveled to Portland in 1920 to take part in the Maine Centennial Exposition. They set up an "Indian Village" at Deering Oaks Park.

Exhibit

Farm-yard Frames

Throughout New England, barns attached to houses are fairly common. Why were the buildings connected? What did farmers or families gain by doing this? The phenomenon was captured in the words of a children's song, "Big house, little house, back house, barn," (Thomas C. Hubka <em>Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn, the Connected Farm Buildings of New England,</em> University Press of New England, 1984.)

Exhibit

Waldoboro Fire Department's 175 Years

While the town of Waldoboro was chartered in 1773, it began organized fire protection in 1838 with a volunteer fire department and a hand pump fire engine, the Water Witch.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Surry by the Bay - Surry Village School

Surry Village School Text by Lynn Bonsey, with sections adapted from Surry, Maine: An informal History by Osmond C.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - 1895 Village School

1895 Village School Village School student body, Strong, ca. 1895 Item 65513 infoStrong Historical Society Strong had as many as eight…

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

… but children within a couple miles of the village attended the Village School. This building was vacated, and later sold to the Grange, when a…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Carrabassett Village and the Red Stallion Inn circa 1960
by David Rollins

The creation of Carrabassett Village and the Red Stallion Inn at Sugarloaf USA

Story

The Village Cafe - A Place We Called Home
by Michael Fixaris

The Village Cafe was more than a restaurant. It was an extension of our homes and our families.

Story

Memories of a mission in Vietnam, January 11, 1970
by SGT. Ronald Santerre, 1st Calvary Division

Extracting villagers from the Viet Cong in Vietnam

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Village Blacksmith - The Reality of a Poem

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
"The Village Blacksmith" was a much celebrated poem. Written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the poem appeared to celebrate the work ethic and mannerisms of a working man, the icon of every rural community, the Blacksmith. However, what was the poem really saying?

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow's "The Village Blacksmith" and "Whitman's Song of Myself" - Alternative Constructions of the American Worker

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Most if not all of us have or will need to work in the American marketplace for at least six decades of our lives. There's a saying that I remember a superintendent telling a group of graduating high-school seniors: remember, when you are on your deathbed, you will not be saying that you wish you had spent more time "at the office." But Americans do spend a lot more time working each year than nearly any other people on the planet. By the end of our careers, many of us will have spent more time with our co-workers than with our families. Already in the 21st century, much has been written about the "Wal-Martization" of the American workplace, about how, despite rocketing profits, corporations such as Wal-Mart overwork and underpay their employees, how workers' wages have remained stagnant since the 1970s, while the costs of college education and health insurance have risen out of reach for many citizens. It's become a cliché to say that the gap between the "haves" and the "have nots" is widening to an alarming degree. In his book Wealth and Democracy, Kevin Phillips says we are dangerously close to becoming a plutocracy in which one dollar equals one vote. Such clashes between employers and employees, and between our rhetoric of equality of opportunity and the reality of our working lives, are not new in America. With the onset of the industrial revolution in the first half of the nineteenth century, many workers were displaced from their traditional means of employment, as the country shifted from a farm-based, agrarian economy toward an urban, manufacturing-centered one. In cities such as New York, groups of "workingmen" (early manifestations of unions) protested, sometimes violently, unsatisfactory labor conditions. Labor unions remain a controversial political presence in America today. Longfellow and Whitman both wrote with sympathy about the American worker, although their respective portraits are strikingly different, and worth juxtaposing. Longfellow's poem "The Village Blacksmith" is one of his most famous and beloved visions: in this poem, one blacksmith epitomizes characteristics and values which many of Longfellow's readers, then and now, revere as "American" traits. Whitman's canto (a section of a long poem) 15 from "Song of Myself," however, presents many different "identities" of the American worker, representing the entire social spectrum, from the crew of a fish smack to the president (I must add that Whitman's entire "Song of Myself" is actually 52 cantos in length). I do not pretend to offer these single texts as all-encompassing of the respective poets' ideas about workers, but these poems offer a starting place for comparison and contrast. We know that Longfellow was the most popular American poet of the nineteenth century, just as we know that Whitman came to be one of the most controversial. Read more widely in the work of both poets and decide for yourselves which poet speaks to you more meaningfully and why.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Integration of Longfellow's Poetry into American Studies

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
We explored Longfellow's ability to express universality of human emotions/experiences while also looking at the patterns he articulated in history that are applicable well beyond his era. We attempted to link a number of Longfellow's poems with different eras in U.S. History and accompanying literature, so that the poems complemented the various units. With each poem, we want to explore the question: What is American identity?