Search Results

Keywords: United States

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 3459 Showing 3 of 3459

Item 23273

United States Life-Saving Service men at drill, 1910

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1910 Location: Biddeford Media: Photographic print

Item 9359

Maine, from the United States Gazetteer, 1795

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1795 Media: Ink on paper

Item 98871

Cover, Instruction Book and Guide to the United States Riviera Recreational Area, Nice, France, 1945

Contributed by: Patricia Morin through Franco-American Collection Date: 1945 Location: Nice; Lewiston Media: Ink on paper

Tax Records

View All Showing 2 of 3 Showing 3 of 3

Item 53805

Assessor's Record, 314 Fore Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: United States Government Use: Custom House

Item 63258

Assessor's Record, 65-79 Exchange Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: United States Government Use: Post Office

Item 65229

73-75 Newbury Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: David Finkelman Use: Apartments

Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 129 Showing 3 of 129

Exhibit

State of Mind: Becoming Maine

The history of the region now known as Maine did not begin at statehood in 1820. What was Maine before it was a state? How did Maine separate from Massachusetts? How has the Maine we experience today been shaped by thousands of years of history?

Exhibit

Civil Defense: Fear and Safety

In the 1950s and the 1960s, Maine's Civil Defense effort focused on preparedness for hurricanes, floods and other natural disasters and a more global concern, nuclear war. Civil Defense materials urged awareness, along with measures like storing food and other staple items and preparing underground or other shelters.

Exhibit

The British capture and occupation of Eastport 1814-1818

The War of 1812 ended in December 1814, but Eastport continued to be under British control for another four years. Eastport was the last American territory occupied by the British from the War of 1812 to be returned to the United States. Except for the brief capture of two Aleutian Islands in Alaska by the Japanese in World War II, it was the last time since 2018 that United States soil was occupied by a foreign government.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 1020 Showing 3 of 1020

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Grant Memorial United Methodist Church

Grant Memorial United Methodist Church Text by Emma and Hana, students at Presque Isle Middle School Images from X X The current site of…

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - State Street Baptist Church

On January 1, 1970, the name was changed to State Street Baptist Church. The church building is the oldest public standing building in Presque Isle.

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - State Street Theater

State Street Theater Text by Kali and Brooke, students at Presque Isle Middle School Images from and the students X X The State Street…

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 54 Showing 3 of 54

Story

How Mon-Oncle France came to Les-√Čtats
by Michael Parent

How Mon-Oncle France came to the United States.

Story

My service in Afghanistan with the Marines and my life today
by Nicholas Krier

My service in Afghanistan with the Marines

Story

How I broke the mold for women to serve in the military
by Mary D. McGuirk

My life and career as a USAF Nurse

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 10 Showing 3 of 10

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between Maine (and the United States) and the Wabanaki peoples living within the drawn boundaries of the state over the last 400 years. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by looking at colonial treaties and proclamations, and legislative acts in the 20th and 21st centuries including the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act and the 21st century legal cases that the act spurred.