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Keywords: Tree

Historical Items

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Item 26925

Cutting tree, Presque Isle, October, 1959

Contributed by: Presque Isle Historical Society Date: 1959 Location: Presque Isle Media: Photographic print

Item 26924

Harvesting the 1959 National Christmas Tree, Presque Isle, 1959

Contributed by: Presque Isle Historical Society Date: 1959 Location: Presque Isle Media: Photographic print

Item 26958

Christmas tree frame work, Presque Isle, 1959

Contributed by: Presque Isle Historical Society Date: 1959 Location: Presque Isle Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 35761

2-8 Brown Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Albert S Rines Use: Stores & Offices

Item 85900

Scribner property, E. side Island Avenue, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Grace E. Scribner Use: Summer Dwelling

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111585

Haffenreffer residence elevations, Yarmouth, 1987

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1987 Location: Yarmouth Client: Rudolf F. Haffenreffer IV Architect: Carol A. Wilson; Carol A. Wilson, Architect

Item 111594

Cape Cottage Park, Cape Elizabeth, ca. 1925

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1924–1926 Location: Cape Elizabeth Client: Cape Cottage Park Company Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Focus on Trees

Maine has some 17 million acres of forest land. But even on a smaller, more local scale, trees have been an important part of the landscape. In many communities, tree-lined commercial and residential streets are a dominant feature of photographs of the communities.

Exhibit

WWI Memorial Trees along Portland's Baxter Boulevard

On Memorial Day of 1920, the City of Portland planted 100 Linden trees on Forest Avenue, each dedicated to the memory of one military service member who had died in World War I, or who had served honorably.

Exhibit

Big Timber: the Mast Trade

Britain was especially interested in occupying Maine during the Colonial era to take advantage of the timber resources. The tall, straight, old growth white pines were perfect for ships' masts to help supply the growing Royal Navy.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Martin-Raynes-Stevens Family Trees

Martin-Raynes-Stevens Family Trees John Martin's Journal begins with a genealogy for his family and that of his wife, Clara Cary.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - John Martin cone cedar tree, Bangor, 1866

He wrote under the illustration, "My cone cedar tree transplanted Oct 25 1866." View additional information about this item on the Maine Memory…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Wikpiyik: The Basket Tree
by Darren Ranco

Countering the Emerald Ash Borer with Wabanaki Ecological Knowledge

Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity

Story

The Point
by Norma K. Salway

In the summer, on the eastern shore of Songo, kids dove from a leaning tree

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Why is Maine the Pine Tree State?

Grade Level: K-2 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students in early elementary grades a foundation for identifying the recognizable animals and natural resources of Maine. In this lesson, students will learn about and identify animals and plants significant to the state, and will identify what types of environments are best suited to different types of plant and animal life. Students will have the opportunity to put their own community wildlife into a large-scale perspective.