Search Results

Keywords: Sweet

Historical Items

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Item 12958

George A. Sweet General Store, Littleton, ca. 1935

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum Date: circa 1935 Location: Littleton Media: Photographic print

Item 13940

George H. Sweet

Contributed by: Bucksport Historical Society Date: circa 1880 Location: Bucksport Media: Photographic print

Item 13647

George H. Sweet medal, Bucksport, ca. 1885

Contributed by: Bucksport Historical Society Date: circa 1885 Location: Bucksport Media: Cloth, metal

Tax Records

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Item 32862

Dwelling, Ardmore Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Estate of Ethel E. Sweet Style: National Folk Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 88081

Rogers property, Island Avenue, Long Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Geneva B. Rogers Use: Sweet Shop and Fish Market

Item 90175

Rankin property, W. Side Sunset Road, Cliff Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: James Rankin Use: Summer Dwelling

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 109763

Alteration and Additions to Factory Building for Lunn & Sweet Shoe Co., Auburn, 1916-1919

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1916–1919 Location: Auburn Client: Lunn and Sweet Shoe Company Architect: Harry S. Coombs

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Maine Sweets: Confections and Confectioners

From chocolate to taffy, Mainers are inventive with our sweet treats. In addition to feeding our sweet tooth, it's also an economic driver for the state.

Exhibit

How Sweet It Is

Desserts have always been a special treat. For centuries, Mainers have enjoyed something sweet as a nice conclusion to a meal or celebrate a special occasion. But many things have changed over the years: how cooks learn to make desserts, what foods and tools were available, what was important to people.

Exhibit

Blueberries to Potatoes: Farming in Maine

Not part of the American "farm belt," Maine nonetheless has been known over the years for a few agricultural items, especially blueberries, sweet corn, potatoes, apples, chickens and dairy products.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

… Item 68432 infoStrong Historical Society Strong High School students seen on a day trip to Porter Lake, also known as Sweets Pond in 1909.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Village School 1905

… Item 68432 infoStrong Historical Society Strong High School students seen on a day trip to Porter Lake, also known as Sweets Pond in 1909.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Not at all visible but on the right is the Methodist Church and on the left is the Diah Sweet store.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Welimahskil: Sweet grass
by Suzanne Greenlaw

Weaving Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and western science around Sweetgrass

Story

Pandemic Blues
by Darlene Reardon

Covid 19 Portland poem

Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity