Search Results

Keywords: Street art

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 819 Showing 3 of 819

Item 10905

Main Street, Caribou, ca. 1895

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum (Houlton Museum) Date: circa 1895 Location: Caribou Media: Photographic print

Item 10915

Sweden Street, Caribou, ca. 1895

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum (Houlton Museum) Date: circa 1895 Location: Caribou Media: Photographic print

Item 13598

High Street, Houlton, 1891

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum (Houlton Museum) Date: 1891-02-27 Location: Houlton Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

View All Showing 2 of 11 Showing 3 of 11

Item 76259

95-107 Spring Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Portland Society of Art Style: Federal Use: Art Museum

Item 76260

95-107 Spring Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Portland Society of Art Style: Greek Revival Use: Art School

Item 32509

50-52 Avon Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Alma C Manning Style: Beaux Arts Use: Dwelling - Single family

Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 66 Showing 3 of 66

Exhibit

Maine Streets: The Postcard View

Photographers from the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Co. of Belfast traveled throughout the state, especially in small communities, taking images for postcards. Many of these images, taken in the first three decades of the twentieth century, capture Main Streets on the brink of modernity.

Exhibit

Art of the People: Folk Art in Maine

For many different reasons people saved and carefully preserved the objects in this exhibit. Eventually, along with the memories they hold, the objects were passed to the Maine Historical Society. Object and memory, serve as a powerful way to explore history and to connect to the lives of people in the past.

Exhibit

A City Awakes: Arts and Artisans of Early 19th Century Portland

Portland's growth from 1786 to 1860 spawned a unique social and cultural environment and fostered artistic opportunity and creative expression in a broad range of the arts, which flowered with the increasing wealth and opportunity in the city.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 177 Showing 3 of 177

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - 94 Front Street

Oliver Moses and his brother William built and owned many blocks and buildings in commercial Bath, including part of the Union Block, where 94 Front…

Site Page

Aroostook Historical and Art Museum

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Division Street School, Bangor, 1865

… "South End and eastern side of Division Street school House situated on the north side of the street in the rear of the Resivoir, House painted…

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 4 Showing 3 of 4

Story

Scientist Turned Artist Making Art Out of Trash
by Ian Trask

Bowdoin College alum returns to midcoast Maine to make environmentally conscious artwork

Story

Story of the "little nun"
by Felicia Garant

My grandmother made a nun's outfit for me

Story

Growing up DownEast
by Darrin MC Mclellan

Stories of growing up Downeast

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 1 of 1 Showing 1 of 1

Lesson Plan

Portland History: "My Lost Youth" - Longfellow's Portland, Then and Now

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow loved his boyhood home of Portland, Maine. Born on Fore Street, the family moved to his maternal grandparents' home on Congress Street when Henry was eight months old. While he would go on to Bowdoin College and travel extensively abroad, ultimately living most of his adult years in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he never forgot his beloved Portland. Years after his childhood, in 1855, he wrote "My Lost Youth" about his undiminished love for and memories of growing up in Portland. This exhibit, using the poem as its focus, will present the Portland of Longfellow's boyhood. In many cases the old photos will be followed by contemporary images of what that site looked like 2004. Following the exhibit of 68 slides are five suggested lessons that can be adapted for any grade level, 3–12.