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Keywords: Somes family

Historical Items

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Item 78956

Abraham Somes III, Somesville, ca. 1855

Contributed by: Mount Desert Island Historical Society Date: circa 1855 Location: Mount Desert Media: Photographic print

Item 67361

Virginia Somes Sanderson, Sheep Island, Somesville Harbor, 1949

Contributed by: Mount Desert Island Historical Society Date: circa 1949 Location: Mount Desert Media: Photographic print

Item 78946

Emilie Clarissa Meynell Somes and Thaddeus Sheply Somes, Somesville, ca 1905

Contributed by: Mount Desert Island Historical Society Date: circa 1905 Location: Mount Desert Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 53195

47-57 Fore Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Estate of Nathan E. Redlon Use: Dwelling - Two family

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Elise Fellows White: Music, Writing, and Family

From a violin prodigy in her early years to an older woman -- mother of two -- struggling financially, Skowhegan native Mary Elise Fellows White remained committed to music, writing, poetry, her extended family -- and living a life that would matter and be remembered.

Exhibit

The Life and Legacy of the George Tate Family

Captain George Tate, mast agent for the King of England from 1751 to the Revolutionary War, and his descendants helped shape the development of Portland (first known as Falmouth) through activities such as commerce, shipping, and real estate.

Exhibit

The Sanitary Commission: Meeting Needs of Soldiers, Families

The Sanitary Commission, formed soon after the Civil War began in the spring of 1861, dealt with the health, relief needs, and morale of soldiers and their families. The Maine Agency helped families and soldiers with everything from furloughs to getting new socks.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Savage Family of Mount Desert

The Savage Family of Mount Desert Augustus Chase Savage & Family, Northeast Harbor, ca. 1890Item Contributed byMount Desert Island Historical…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Bryants and Rockefellers: Two Seal Harbor Families

His family tree can be traced back through some of the first families to ever set foot on Mt. Desert Island and the outlying crops of lands.

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Mabelle Martin's casket, Bangor, 1899

… in which he recounted his activities and recalled some of his history. The illustration is on page 154.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Apple Time - a visit to the ancestral farm
by Randy Randall

Memories from childhood of visiting the family homestead in Limington during apple picking time.

Story

The Village Cafe - A Place We Called Home
by Michael Fixaris

The Village Cafe was more than a restaurant. It was an extension of our homes and our families.

Story

A Note from a Maine-American
by William Dow Turner

With 7 generations before statehood, and 5 generations since, Maine DNA carries on.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.