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Keywords: Somes Harbor

Historical Items

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Item 16460

Somes Sound Looking South

Contributed by: Southwest Harbor Public Library Date: 1893-08-31 Location: Southwest Harbor; Southwest Harbor Media: Photographic print

Item 21186

Somes Sound, Mt. Desert Island, ca.1900

Contributed by: Great Harbor Maritime Museum Date: circa 1900 Location: Mount Desert Media: Photographic print

Item 67361

Virginia Somes Sanderson, Sheep Island, Somesville Harbor, 1949

Contributed by: Mount Desert Island Historical Society Date: circa 1949 Location: Mount Desert Media: Photographic print

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Designing Acadia

For one hundred years, Acadia National Park has captured the American imagination and stood as the most recognizable symbol of Maine’s important natural history and identity. This exhibit highlights Maine Memory content relating to Acadia and Mount Desert Island.

Exhibit

Summer Folk: The Postcard View

Vacationers, "rusticators," or tourists began flooding into Maine in the last quarter of the 19th century. Many arrived by train or steamer. Eventually, automobiles expanded and changed the tourist trade, and some vacationers bought their own "cottages."

Exhibit

Bowdoin College Scientific Expedition to Labrador

"The Bowdoin Boys" -- some students and recent graduates -- traveled to Labrador in 1891 to collect artifacts, specimens, and to try to find Grand Falls, a waterfall deep in Labrador's interior.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - II. Ripples of change: European exploration & settlement at Winter Harbor - Page 2 of 2

… European exploration & settlement at Winter Harbor Piles of logs along the Saco River, ca.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Arriving in Bar Harbor

Arriving in Bar Harbor Bar Harbor steamboat landing, ca. 1885Item Contributed byMaine Historic Preservation Commission Arriving at the Bar…

Site Page

Winter Harbor Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

An enjoyable conference, Portland 2021
by John C. Decker, Danville, Pennsylvania

Some snippets from a 4-day conference by transportation historians in Portland, September 7-11, 2021

Story

The Joys of Kayaking - Pam's Story
by Pam Ferris-Olson

Pam has kayaked in many special places but her fondest memories are being made on Casco Bay

Story

Portland in the 1940s
by Carol Norton Hall

As a young woman in Portland during WWII, the presence of servicemen was life changing.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?