Search Results

Keywords: Social activities

Historical Items

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Item 79297

Student Activities Card, Farmington State Normal School, 1942

Contributed by: Mantor Library at UMF Date: 1942 Location: Farmington Media: Ink on paper

Item 19158

Mount Desert Reading Room

Contributed by: Jesup Memorial Library Date: circa 1910 Location: Bar Harbor Media: Postcard

Item 31304

Anti suffrage report on activities, Portland, ca. 1915

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1916 Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

Protests

Throughout the history of the state, residents have protested, on paper or in the streets, to increase rights for various groups, to effect social change, to prevent social change, or to let their feelings be known about important issues.

Exhibit

We Used to be "Normal": A History of F.S.N.S.

Farmington's Normal School -- a teacher-training facility -- opened in 1863 and, over the decades, offered academic programs that included such unique features as domestic and child-care training, and extra-curricular activities from athletics to music and theater.

Exhibit

Begin Again: reckoning with intolerance in Maine

BEGIN AGAIN explores Maine's historic role, going back 528 years, in crisis that brought about the pandemic, social and economic inequities, and the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Activities for Rusticators

… cottagers initiated new activities, events, and social clubs: Enter the horse show? Dress up for a masquerade ball? Attend a concert at the…

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Bangor and Social Reform Movements of the 1800s-1900s

2013, web.colby.edu/activism/stories/frederick-douglass-speaks-at-colby/. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017. "Temperance movement." Britannica School…

Site Page

Maine Conservation Corps

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

How 20 years in the Navy turned me into an active volunteer
by Joy Asuncion

My service didn't end when I retired from the Navy

Story

Creating the Purr-Sist button
by Ellen Crocker

Motivated by the Women's March and Sen. Warren, I created these buttons

Story

I was a regional volunteer coordinator for the Women’s March
by Erica McNally

Erica McNally's experiences in Washington at the Women's March, 2017

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between the Wabanaki Tribes/Nations and the State of Maine. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by taking a close look at documents relating to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 (MICSA) and the issues that preceded and have followed the Act.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Primary Sources: Maine Women's Causes and Influence before 1920

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students the opportunity to read and analyze letters, literature, and other primary documents and articles of material culture from the MHS collections relating to the women of Maine between the end of the Revolutionary War through the national vote for women’s suffrage in 1920. Students will discuss issues including war relief (Civil War and World War I), suffrage, abolition, and temperance, and how the women of Maine mobilized for or in some cases helped to lead these movements.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Building Community/Community Buildings

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Where do people gather? What defines a community? What buildings allow people to congregate to celebrate, learn, debate, vote, and take part in all manner of community activities? Students will evaluate images and primary documents from throughout Maine’s history, and look at some of Maine’s earliest gathering spaces and organizations, and how many communities established themselves around certain types of buildings. Students will make connections between the community buildings of the past and the ways we express identity and create communities today.