Search Results

Keywords: Produce

Historical Items

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Item 16023

Maine Special potato bag, Presque Isle, c. 1950

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum Date: circa 1950 Location: Presque Isle Media: Paper

Item 16039

Always Fresh potato bag, Caribou, c. 1975

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum Date: circa 1975 Location: Caribou Media: Paper

Item 16050

get real. get maine! potato bag, Caribou, ca. 1980

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum Date: circa 1940 Location: Caribou Media: Paper

Tax Records

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Item 37344

253-263 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Hannaford Bros. Cco. Use: Wholesale Fruit

Item 37295

126 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Marcia W Rackleff Use: Storage - Produce

Item 37289

113-15 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Nathaniel W Shaw Use: Store & Storage

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 110141

Hannaford Brothers produce warehouse, Portland, 1919-1920

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1919–1920 Location: Portland Client: Hannaford Brothers Company Architect: John Calvin Stevens John Howard Stevens Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Yarmouth: Leader in Soda Pulp

Yarmouth's "Third Falls" provided the perfect location for papermaking -- and, soon, for producing soda pulp for making paper. At the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th, Yarmouth was an international leader in soda pulp production.

Exhibit

Gunpowder for the Civil War

The gunpowder mills at Gambo Falls in Windham and Gorham produced about a quarter of the gunpowder used by Union forces during the Civil War. The complex contained as many as 50 buildings.

Exhibit

Lincoln County through the Eastern Eye

The Penobscot Marine Museum’s photography collections include nearly 50,000 glass plate negatives of images for "real photo" postcards produced by the Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company of Belfast. This exhibit features postcards from Lincoln County.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

Carroll H. Brackley also produced toothpicks under the name Strong Wood Turning Co. for more than 30 years.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Brackleys

produced thousands of different styles of novelties. These candle holders were one of the novelties.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Forsters

Co. produced round toothpicks under the World's Fair name in Strong from 1910 until they closed operations in 2002.

My Maine Stories

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Story

The future of potato growing
by Dan Blackstone

Informed by six generations of potato farming

Story

The centuries-long history of Passamaquoddy Veterans
by Donald Soctomah, Passamaquoddy Historic Preservation Office

Passamaquoddy Veterans Protecting the Homeland

Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Poet's Tale - The Birds of Killingworth"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This poem is one of the numerous tales in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Tales of the Wayside Inn. The collection was published in three parts between 1863 and 1873. This series of long narrative poems were written by Longfellow during the most difficult personal time of his life. While mourning the tragic death of his second wife (Fanny Appleton Longfellow) he produced this ambitious undertaking. During this same period he translated Dante's Inferno from Italian to English. "The Poet's Tale" is a humorous poem with a strong environmental message which reflects Longfellow's Unitarian outlook on life.