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Keywords: Procession

Historical Items

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Item 94892

GAR Procession, Memorial Day, 1900

Contributed by: Presque Isle Historical Society Date: 1900 Location: Presque Isle Media: Photographic print

Item 21013

Invitation to Presidential funeral procession, Portland, 1850

Contributed by: Pierce Family Collection through Maine Historical Society Date: 1850-07-31 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 9907

Procession, Main Street, Sanford, ca. 1910

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1910 Location: Sanford Media: Photographic print

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 110756

B&M store house and canning factory, Portland, 1918-1944

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1918–1944 Location: Portland; Farmington; Livermore Falls Client: Burnham and Morrill Co. Architect: John Calvin Stevens John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 109133

Hancock County Cold Storage Inc. poultry processing plant, Ellsworth, 1950

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1950 Location: Ellsworth Client: Hancock County Cold Storage Inc. Architect: Eaton W. Tarbell

Item 116307

Fitzgerald house, Brighton, VT, 1888

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1888 Location: Brighton Client: George H. Fitzgerald Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Canning: A Maine Industry

Maine's corn canning industry, as illuminated by the career of George S. Jewett, prospered between 1850 and 1950.

Exhibit

La St-Jean in Lewiston-Auburn

St-Jean-Baptiste Day -- June 24th -- in Lewiston-Auburn was a very public display of ethnic pride for nearly a century. Since about 1830, French Canadians had used St. John the Baptist's birthdate as a demonstration of French-Canadian nationalism.

Exhibit

Fair Season: Crops, Livestock, and Entertainment

Agricultural fairs, intended to promote new techniques and better farming methods, have been held since the early 19th century. Before long, entertainments were added to the educational focus of the early fairs.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Project Process

Project Process 2009-2010 With three schools and two community organizations involved, choosing five exhibit topics for our Bangor Community…

Site Page

Lubec, Maine - McCurdy Herring Smokehouse - Page 1 of 4

In the second section in Part I six steps involved in this food preservation process are shown. A long-time seasonal resident of Lubec, Frank Van…

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Lewiston Journal article on Katahdin Iron Works

It describes the process of making pig iron and gives some background about the Kathadin Iron Charcoal Co. and the area where it was located.

My Maine Stories

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Story

How Belfast was the Chicken Capital of the Northeast
by Ralph Chavis

My memories of spending time in Belfast as a child when my father worked in the chicken industry.

Story

Cleaning Fish or How Grandfather and Grandmother got by
by Randy Randall

Grandfather and Grandmother subsisted on the fish Grandfather caught, not always legally.

Story

My artwork help process memories of Vietnam
by Brian Barry

My Eagle drawing won first place in the Togus Arts and Crafts show, third in the Nationals.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine's Beneficial Bugs: Insect Sculpture Upcycle/ Recycle S.T.E.A.M Challenge

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Visual & Performing Arts
In honor of Earth Day (or any day), Students use recycled, reused, and upcycled materials to create a sculpture of a beneficial insect that lives in the state of Maine. Students use the Engineer Design Process to develop their ideas. Students use the elements and principles to analyze their prototypes and utilize interpersonal skills during peer feedback protocol to accept and give constructive feedback.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.