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Keywords: Printing process

Historical Items

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Item 66971

Hollingsworth & Whitney log piling process, Winslow, 1936

Contributed by: Winslow Historical Preservation Committee Date: 1936 Location: Winslow Media: Photographic print

Item 111817

Copperplate engraving of Mechanics' Hall, Portland, 1906

Contributed by: Mechanics' Hall Date: 1906 Location: Portland Media: Copper and wood

Item 1265

Ku Klux Klan procession, Portland, ca. 1923

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1923 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 116430

Portland City Hall, Portland, 1909-1912

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1909–1912 Location: Portland Client: City of Portland Architect: Carrere & Hastings Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Working Women of the Old Port

Women at the turn of the 20th century were increasingly involved in paid work outside the home. For wage-earning women in the Old Port section of Portland, the jobs ranged from canning fish and vegetables to setting type. A study done in 1907 found many women did not earn living wages.

Exhibit

The Mainspring of Fashion

The mainspring of fashion is the process whereby members of one class imitate the styles of another, who in turn are driven to ever new expedients of fashionable change.

Exhibit

Sagadahoc County through the Eastern Eye

The Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company of Belfast, Maine. employed photographers who traveled by company vehicle through New England each summer, taking pictures of towns and cities, vacation spots and tourist attractions, working waterfronts and local industries, and other subjects postcard recipients might enjoy. The cards were printed by the millions in Belfast into the 1940s.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Lubec, Maine - McCurdy Herring Smokehouse - Page 3 of 4

The description in his article, published in the 1896 Report of the U. S. Commission of Fisheries, anticipates what was printed yet almost one…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Maps

… history and see the power of maps in the learning process. UMF Arboretum Trail -- First put together by a biology class at University of Maine…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - SEE NOTES "What the book said to the Boy". Library bookmark.

… Public Library Description Commercially printed bookmark, publisher and date unknown. Bookmarks were distributed by librarians to patrons…

My Maine Stories

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Story

21st and 19th century technology and freelance photography
by Brendan Bullock

My work is a mash-up of cutting edge technology and 19th century chemistry techniques.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.