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Keywords: Power

Historical Items

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Item 74760

Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station, Wiscasset, ca. 1972

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1972 Location: Wiscasset Media: Photographic print

Item 74759

Maine Yankee reactor pit construction, Wiscasset, 1968

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1968 Location: Wiscasset Media: Photographic print

Item 16817

Power Station, Springvale, ca 1905

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1905 Location: Springvale Media: Print from Glass Negative

Tax Records

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Item 87132

Power property, Island Avenue, Long Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Florence W Power Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 87138

Power property, Island Avenue, Long Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Frances W. Power Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 87142

Power property, Island Avenue, Long Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Frances W. Power Use: Summer Dwelling

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Nuclear Energy for Maine?

Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Plant in Wiscasset generated electricity from 1972 until 1996. Activists concerned about the plant's safety led three unsuccessful referendum campaigns in the 1980s to shut it down.

Exhibit

Powering Pejepscot Paper Co.

In 1893, F.C. Whitehouse of Topsham, who owned paper mills in Topsham and Lisbon Falls, began construction of a third mill on the eastern banks of the Androscoggin River five miles north of Topsham. First, he had to build a dam to harness the river's power.

Exhibit

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Central Maine Power

Central Maine Power Ice Storm, Academy Street, Hallowell, 1998Item Contributed byHubbard Free Library CMP Overview CMP crews are the reason…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Maine Granite Industry-Hall Quarry

This company produced steam power that allowed powered tools to be run by compressed air which made it faster and easier.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Day 4 - Page 1 of 3

Now there were 270,000 outages of power and 500,000 people are without power! Over 11,000 Canadian troops came to help.

My Maine Stories

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Story

My education and work at THE Mercy
by Judy Harmon

Judy Harmon discussed X-Ray School, changing technology, and her 1960s jeep

Story

Canadian immigrant founds worlds largest paper company in 1898
by Hugh J. Chisholm

Hugh J. Chisholm founded International Paper, which was the world's largest paper company in 1898.

Story

Wampum Belts
by Donald Soctomah

My great grandfather was a wampum keeper

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Exile of the People of Longfellow's "Evangeline"

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Other materials needed: - Copy of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "Evangeline" - Print media and Internet access for research - Deportation Orders (may use primary document with a secondary source interpretation) Throughout the course of history there have been many events in which great suffering was inflicted upon innocent people. The story of the Acadian expulsion is one such event. Britain and France, the two most powerful nations of Europe, were at war off and on throughout the 18th century. North America became a coveted prize for both warring nations. The French Acadians of present day Nova Scotia fell victim to great suffering. Even under an oath of allegiance to England, the Acadians were advised that their families were to be deported and their lands confiscated by the English. This event was immortalized by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem "Evangeline", which was published in 1847.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.