Search Results

Keywords: Politics and government

Historical Items

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Item 101558

The Constitution of the State of Maine and that of the United States, Portland, 1825

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1825 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

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Item 23781

Hannah Pierce on politics, 1833

Contributed by: Pierce Family Collection through Maine Historical Society Date: 1833 Location: Baldwin Media: Ink on paper

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Item 15556

Cartoon about 1926 politics

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1926 Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Margaret Chase Smith: A Historic Candidacy

When she announced her candidacy for President in January 1964, three-term Republican Senator Margaret Chase Smith became the first woman to seek the nomination of one of the two major political parties.

Exhibit

Port of Portland's Custom House and Collectors of Customs

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage.

Exhibit

Slavery's Defenders and Foes

Mainers, like residents of other states, had differing views about slavery and abolition in the early to mid decades of the 19th century. Religion and economic factors were among the considerations in determining people's leanings.

Site Pages

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Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Grant-Wilson political rally, Augusta Depot, 1872

John Martin (1823-1904) of Bangor illustrated the event as part of his "Scrap Book no 3" that he wrote and illustrated starting in 1876.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Overview: Road to Statehood

As whispers of separation became louder in the late 1700s, various political grievances began to dominate the growing debate.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Maine in the 17th Century

… of Kittery swore their allegiance to the government of Massachusetts Bay, and by 1658, Kittery, York, Saco, Wells and Cape Porpoise (Kennebunkport)…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Pandemic ruminations and the death of Rose Cleveland
by Tilly Laskey

Correlations between the 1918 and 2020 Pandemics

Story

Wampum Belts
by Donald Soctomah

My great grandfather was a wampum keeper

Story

Restoring the Penobscot River
by John Banks

My role as the Director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine: The Votes for Statehood

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine became a state in 1820 after separating from Massachusetts, but the call for statehood had begun long before the final vote. Why did it take so long? Was 1820 the right time? In this lesson, students will begin to place where Maine’s statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American political history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.