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Keywords: Political figures

Historical Items

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Item 102202

Letter from Ann King to William King, 1820

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1820-01-25 Location: Bath Media: Ink on paper

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Item 102140

Rufus King, Scarborough, 1815

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1815 Location: Scarborough Media: Print on paper

Item 102141

Rufus King on a Biddeford farm for sale, Newburyport, 1782

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1782-10-23 Location: Biddeford; Newburyport; Dunstable; Boston Media: Ink on paper

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Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Margaret Chase Smith: A Historic Candidacy

When she announced her candidacy for President in January 1964, three-term Republican Senator Margaret Chase Smith became the first woman to seek the nomination of one of the two major political parties.

Exhibit

John Hancock's Relation to Maine

The president of the Continental Congress and the Declaration's most notable signatory, John Hancock, has ties to Maine through politics, and commercial businesses, substantial property, vacations, and family.

Exhibit

Port of Portland's Custom House and Collectors of Customs

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Missouri Compromise: A Moral Dilemma

[34] For further details on this debate and the opinions of Maine politicians and national figures, see Banks, Maine Becomes a State, 188-204.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - Turn of the Century to the War of 1812

1806 William King became a prominent figure in 19th century Maine separation politics and would continue to play a major role in early statehood as…

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Scrapbook 3: 1867-

…   Part 2, pages 30-47 Profiles of political figures, including Hannibal Hamlin, 1866 election results   Part 3, pages 48-64 More Hannibal…

My Maine Stories

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Story

An Asian American Account
by Zabrina

An account from a Chinese American teen during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride Companion Curriculum

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
These lesson plans were developed by Maine Historical Society for the Seashore Trolley Museum as a companion curriculum for the historical fiction YA novel "Teddy Roosevelt, Millie, and the Elegant Ride" by Jean. M. Flahive (2019). The novel tells the story of Millie Thayer, a young girl who dreams of leaving the family farm, working in the city, and fighting for women's suffrage. Millie's life begins to change when a "flying carpet" shows up in the form of an electric trolley that cuts across her farm and when a fortune-teller predicts that Millie's path will cross that of someone famous. Suddenly, Millie finds herself caught up in events that shake the nation, Maine, and her family. The lesson plans in this companion curriculum explore a variety of topics including the history of the trolley use in early 20th century Maine, farm and rural life at the turn of the century, the story of Theodore Roosevelt and his relationship with Maine, WWI, and the flu pandemic of 1918-1920.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine's Acadian Community: "Evangeline," Le Grand Dérangement, and Cultural Survival

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce students to the history of the forced expulsion of thousands of people from Acadia, the Romantic look back at the tragedy in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous epic poem Evangeline and the heroine's adoption as an Acadian cultural figure, and Maine's Acadian community today, along with their relations with Acadian New Brunswick and Nova Scotia residents and others in the Acadian Diaspora. Students will read and discuss primary documents, compare and contrast Le Grand Dérangement to other forced expulsions in Maine history and discuss the significance of cultural survival amidst hardships brought on by treaties, wars, and legislation.