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Keywords: Political appointments

Historical Items

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Item 77743

George Beal on political appointments, Washington, 1869

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1869 Location: Portland; Norway Media: Ink on paper

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Item 77737

George Beal letter on federal appointments, Norway, 1869

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1869 Location: Norway; Portland Media: Ink on paper

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Item 77769

G.F. Shepley appointment as circuit judge, Washington, 1869

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1869 Location: Washington; Portland Media: Ink on paper

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Architecture & Landscape

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Item 116320

Capt. John Deering house, 1884-1919

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1884–1919 Location: Portland; Portland; Kennebunkport Client: John W. Deering Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Margaret Chase Smith: A Historic Candidacy

When she announced her candidacy for President in January 1964, three-term Republican Senator Margaret Chase Smith became the first woman to seek the nomination of one of the two major political parties.

Exhibit

Port of Portland's Custom House and Collectors of Customs

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage.

Exhibit

State of Mind: Becoming Maine

The history of the region now known as Maine did not begin at statehood in 1820. What was Maine before it was a state? How did Maine separate from Massachusetts? How has the Maine we experience today been shaped by thousands of years of history?

Site Pages

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Site Page

Maine Department of Transportation

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Bangor and the Civil War Resources

Being the Report of a Commission of Inquiry, Appointed by the United States Sanitary Commission. With an Appendix, Containing the Testimony.

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - The Customs House

Robinson, David Branson and William M. Reed were appointed as commissioners to construct the building.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Amongst His Contemporaries - The Ship of State DBQ

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Lesson plans should be done in the context of a course of study on American literature and/or history from the Revolution to the Civil War. The ship of state is an ancient metaphor in the western world, especially among seafaring people, but this figure of speech assumed a more widespread and literal significance in the English colonies of the New World. From the middle of the 17th century, after all, until revolution broke out in 1775, the dominant system of governance in the colonies was the Navigation Acts. The primary responsibility of colonial governors, according to both Parliament and the Crown, was the enforcement of the laws of trade, and the governors themselves appointed naval officers to ensure that the various provisions and regulations of the Navigation Acts were executed. England, in other words, governed her American colonies as if they were merchant ships. This metaphorical conception of the colonies as a naval enterprise not only survived the Revolution but also took on a deeper relevance following the construction of the Union. The United States of America had now become the ship of state, launched on July 4th 1776 and dedicated to the radical proposition that all men are created equal and endowed with certain unalienable rights. This proposition is examined and tested in any number of ways during the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. Novelists and poets, as well as politicians and statesmen, questioned its viability: Whither goes the ship of state? Is there a safe harbor somewhere up ahead or is the vessel doomed to ruin and wreckage? Is she well built and sturdy or is there some essential flaw in her structural frame?