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Keywords: Penobscot Indian Nation

Historical Items

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Item 80731

Band box basket, Penobscot, ca. 1850

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1850 Media: Ash splints, indigo dye

Item 23481

Penobscot rootclub by Russell Joe, Indian Island, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine Date: circa 1930 Location: Indian Island Media: Wood

Item 23505

Penobscot child's moccasins, ca. 1870

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine Date: circa 1870 Location: Indian Island Media: Cloth, beads

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Northern Threads: Penobscot mocassins

A themed exhibit vignette within "Northern Threads, Part I," about telling stories through Indigenous clothing, featuring an essay by Jennifer Sapiel Neptune (Penobscot.)

Exhibit

Gifts From Gluskabe: Maine Indian Artforms

According to legend, the Great Spirit created Gluskabe, who shaped the world of the Native People of Maine, and taught them how to use and respect the land and the resources around them. This exhibit celebrates the gifts of Gluskabe with Maine Indian art works from the early nineteenth to mid twentieth centuries.

Exhibit

Land Claims, Economic Opportunities?

The landmark 1980 Maine Indian Land Claims Settlement Act provided $81.6 million to Maine Indians for economic development, land purchase and other purposes. The money and increased land holdings, however, have not solved economic and employment issues for Maine Indians.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Narrative

The beauty of the Penobscot and Kenduskeag Rivers, as first described by Champlain, is again seen as a vital part of the history, heritage, and…

Site Page

Lincoln, Maine - That Pioneer Spirit

… paddle up the Penobscot River, walk the ancient Indian footpaths while fording the streams, or trek beside ox-drawn wagons over river ice.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Indian Encampment

The Indian Encampment Wabanaki family inside tent, Bar Harbor, ca. 1885Item Contributed byMaine Historic Preservation Commission Rusticators…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Restoring the Penobscot River
by John Banks

My role as the Director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation

Story

Decontie and Brown's venture in high fashion design
by Decontie and Brown

Penobscot haute couture designs from Bangor

Story

Margaret Moxa's Blanket Coat
by Jennifer Neptune

A contemporary artwork in memory of Penobscots murdered for scalp bounties.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between the Wabanaki Tribes/Nations and the State of Maine. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by taking a close look at documents relating to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 (MICSA) and the issues that preceded and have followed the Act.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.