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Keywords: Penobscot

Historical Items

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Item 11500

Wardwell family, Penobscot, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Penobscot Media: Photographic print

Item 23480

Miniature rootclub, ca. 1850

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine Date: circa 1850 Location: Penobscot Media: Wood

Item 80713

Penobscot snowshoes, ca. 1850

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1850 Location: Indian Island Media: Ash, hide, sinew

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Gluskap of the Wabanaki

Creation and other cultural tales are important to framing a culture's beliefs and values -- and passing those on. The Wabanaki -- Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot -- Indians of Maine and Nova Scotia tell stories of a cultural hero/creator, a giant who lived among them and who promised to return.

Exhibit

Eastern Fine Paper

The paper mill on the Penobscot River in South Brewer, which became known as Eastern Fine Paper Co., began as a sawmill in 1884 and grew over the years as an important part of the economy of the region and a large presence in the landscape. Its closing in 2005 affected more than the men and women who lost their jobs.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Lincoln, Maine - Pulp Mill, Penobscot River, 1902 - Page 1 of 2

Pulp Mill, Penobscot River, 1902 Contributed by Lincoln Historical Society Description Pulp mill on the Mattanawcook Stream, before the…

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Early Railroads in Bangor - Page 2 of 2

Print. Penobscot River Railroad History of Penobscot County Maine, with illustrations and biographical sketches.

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Welcome

Welcome Bangor from the east bank of the Penobscot River, ca. 1905Item Contributed byBangor Public Library Welcome! to the Bangor Community…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Restoring the Penobscot River
by John Banks

My role as the Director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation

Story

Decontie and Brown's venture in high fashion design
by Decontie and Brown

Penobscot haute couture designs from Bangor

Story

Wabanaki Fashion
by Decontie & Brown

Keeping the spirit and memories of our ancestors alive through fashion and creativity

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

The Exile of the People of Longfellow's "Evangeline"

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Other materials needed: - Copy of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "Evangeline" - Print media and Internet access for research - Deportation Orders (may use primary document with a secondary source interpretation) Throughout the course of history there have been many events in which great suffering was inflicted upon innocent people. The story of the Acadian expulsion is one such event. Britain and France, the two most powerful nations of Europe, were at war off and on throughout the 18th century. North America became a coveted prize for both warring nations. The French Acadians of present day Nova Scotia fell victim to great suffering. Even under an oath of allegiance to England, the Acadians were advised that their families were to be deported and their lands confiscated by the English. This event was immortalized by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem "Evangeline", which was published in 1847.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

The Acadian Diaspora

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Evangeline, Longfellow's heroine, has long been read as a search for Evangeline's long-lost love, Gabrielle--separated by the British in 1755 at the time of the Grand Derangement, the Acadian Diaspora. The couple comes to find each other late in life and the story ends. Or does it? Why does Longfellow choose to tell the story of this cultural group with a woman as the protagonist who is a member of a minority culture the Acadians? Does this say something about Longfellow's ability for understanding the misfortunes of others? Who is Evangeline searching for? Is it Gabriel, or her long-lost land of Acadia? Does the couple represent that which is lost to them, the land of their birth and rebirth? These are some of the thoughts and ideas which permeate Longfellow's text, Evangeline, beyond the tale of two lovers lost to one another. As the documentary, Evangeline's Quest (see below) states: "The Acadians, the only people to celebrate their defeat." They, as a cultural group, are found in the poem and their story is told.