Search Results

Keywords: Passamaquoddy

Historical Items

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Item 80748

Picture frame, Passamaquoddy, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1900 Media: Birchbark, ash, sweetgrass

Item 80735

Collar box and collars, Passamaquoddy, ca. 1880

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1880 Media: Birch bark, spruce root, sweetgrass, linen

Item 60515

Ice in Passamaquoddy Bay, Lubec, 1907

Contributed by: Lubec Historical Society Date: 1907 Location: Lubec Media: Postcard

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 111235

Passamaquoddy Bay tidal power development, 1935

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1935 Location: Eastport Client: Passamaquoddy Tidal Power Project Architect: John Calvin Stevens and John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 110191

Passamaquoddy Bay Tidal Power Development temporary buildings, Eastport, 1935

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1935 Location: Eastport Client: United States Government Architect: John Calvin Stevens John Howard Stevens Architects

Item 110192

Passamaquoddy Bay Tidal Power Development temporary buildings, Eastport, 1935

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1935 Location: Eastport Client: United States Government Architect: John Calvin Stevens John Howard Stevens Architects

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Indians at the Centennial

Passamaquoddy Indians from Washington County traveled to Portland in 1920 to take part in the Maine Centennial Exposition. They set up an "Indian Village" at Deering Oaks Park.

Exhibit

Gluskap of the Wabanaki

Creation and other cultural tales are important to framing a culture's beliefs and values -- and passing those on. The Wabanaki -- Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot -- Indians of Maine and Nova Scotia tell stories of a cultural hero/creator, a giant who lived among them and who promised to return.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Swan's Island: Six miles east of ordinary - I. Canoes and Clamshells: The Pre-European Settlement Years

… X The Penobscot and, to a lesser extent, Passamaquoddy were known visitors to Swan’s Island.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - In the beginning, there were the Wabanaki…

We think it hard that you settle the lands that God gave us without making us some consideration. -Passamaquoddy Chief Abowadwonit (1763).

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Wabanaki Today

Clara and Rocky Keezer, Passamaquoddy, selling their baskets at the Native American Festival, 2010. (Photo by Dee Lustusky) X Wabanaki dancers…

My Maine Stories

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Story

The centuries-long history of Passamaquoddy Veterans
by Donald Soctomah, Passamaquoddy Historic Preservation Office

Passamaquoddy Veterans Protecting the Homeland

Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity

Story

Dana Mitchell - MLTI in Passamaquoddy Homelands
by MLTI Stories of Impact Project

Dana Mitchell talked about one-to-one's arrival at one Passamaquoddy Reservation school.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between the Wabanaki Tribes/Nations and the State of Maine. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by taking a close look at documents relating to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 (MICSA) and the issues that preceded and have followed the Act.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.