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Keywords: Note

Historical Items

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Item 105965

Presque Isle National Banknote, 1929

Courtesy of Theodore Ey, an individual partner Date: 1929 Location: Presque Isle Media: Ink on paper

Item 13077

Note from Mark Fernald, 1809

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1809-08-14 Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 6772

Note from C.A. Stephens 1915

Contributed by: An individual through Norway Memorial Library Date: 1915-04-19 Location: Norway Media: Ink on paper

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Tax Records

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Item 41084

168-178 Pine Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Margaret Morrill Use: Garage

Item 49327

10-12 Devonshire Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Charles F Wetherbee Use: Store Building

Item 49328

Assessor's Record, 10 Devonshire Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Charles F Wetherbee Use: Garage

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Bookplates Honor Annie Louise Cary

A summer resident of Wayne collected more than 3,000 bookplates to honor Maine native and noted opera singer Annie Louise Cary and to support the Cary Memorial Library.

Exhibit

MY ISLAND HOME: Verlie Colby Greenleaf of Westport Island

Verlie Greenleaf (1891-1992) bore witness to over a century of Westport Island's history. Many changes occurred during Verlie's 100-year life. Verlie Greenleaf donated photographs, personal notes, and sat for an interview in 1987, all part of the Westport Island History Committee's collection. Her words frame this exhibition, providing a first-person account of her life.

Exhibit

Le Théâtre

Lewiston, Maine's second largest city, was long looked upon by many as a mill town with grimy smoke stacks, crowded tenements, low-paying jobs, sleazy clubs and little by way of refinement, except for Bates College. Yet, a noted Québec historian, Robert Rumilly, described it as "the French Athens of New England."

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Ice Storm Summary Notes

Ice Storm Summary Notes Terrible Beauty During the ice storm of 1998 their were many icicles on the trees, sun shining on the ground covered with…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - SEE NOTES "What the book said to the Boy". Library bookmark.

SEE NOTES "What the book said to the Boy". Library bookmark. Contributed by Farmington Public Library Description Commercially printed…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - SEE NOTES Ladies Third Annual Banquet. Farmington, Maine. 1893. Menu.

SEE NOTES Ladies Third Annual Banquet. Farmington, Maine. 1893. Menu. Contributed by Farmington Public Library Description Inside of the…

My Maine Stories

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Story

A Note from a Maine-American
by William Dow Turner

With 7 generations before statehood, and 5 generations since, Maine DNA carries on.

Story

2020 Sheltering in Place Random Notes During COVID-19
by Phyllis Merriam, LCSW

Sheltering-in-Place personal experiences in mid-coast Maine (Rockland) during March and April 2020

Story

Classroom Time Capsule
by Anna Bennett

On March 12, 2020, I left my classroom not knowing I wouldn't return again for months.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.