Search Results

Keywords: Newspaper

Historical Items

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Item 11436

Newspaper columnist Harold Boyle, 1982

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1982-08-26 Location: Portland Media: Photographic print

Item 36146

Newspaper, Lubec, 1886

Contributed by: Lubec Historical Society Date: 1886 Location: Lubec Media: Ink on paper

Item 16354

'Lisbon Enterprise' fire article, 1901

Contributed by: Lisbon Historical Society Date: 1901-04-08 Location: Lisbon Falls Media: Newspaper

Tax Records

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Item 37301

141-145 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: William J Dennis Use: Store

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 116383

Cummings house, Biddeford, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Biddeford Client: A. L. T. Cummings Architect: John Calvin Stevens

Item 109286

Bangor Daily News alterations, Bangor, 1944

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1944 Location: Bangor Client: Bangor Daily News Architect: Eaton W. Tarbell

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Handwritten Community Newspaper

The eight issues of South Freeport's handwritten newspaper, distributed in 1859, provided "general interest and amusement" to the coastal community.

Exhibit

Eye in the Sky

In 1921, Guy Gannett purchased two competing Portland newspapers, merging them under the Portland Press Herald title. He followed in 1925 with the purchase the Portland Evening Express, which allowed him to combine two passions: photography and aviation.

Exhibit

Most Inconvenient Storm

A Portland newspaper wrote about an ice storm of January 28, 1886 saying, "The city of Portland was visited yesterday by the most inconvenient storm of the season."

Site Pages

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Site Page

Lincoln, Maine - Newspapers

… paragraphs"   Connie Rand Interview on Early Newspapers Newspapers have changed and stayed the same in many ways.

Site Page

Moosehead Messenger

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Portland Press Herald Glass Negative Collection - Sports

… a High School Sports Slideshow Sports, as in newspapers around the globe, occupied a prominent role in the Press Herald and Evening Express…

My Maine Stories

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Story

My WWII Navy Adventure starts at age 13
by I. Robert Miller

My love for the Navy, on 10 ships & many battles, on the cover of Naval aviation News magazine

Story

Norman Sevigny: history of a neighborhood grocery store
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

Growing up in a Franco-American community and working in the family business, Sevigny’s Market

Story

Paul Gagne: Living a life fully engaged in his community
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A man with a wide range of skills and talents shares them for the benefit of his community

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine in the News: World War I Newspaper Project

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan is designed to introduce students to the important role that Maine played in World War I. Students will act as investigators in order to learn about the time period as well as the active role that Maine took on.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.