Search Results

Keywords: Natural Resources

Historical Items

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Item 104351

"Cut logs now!," World War II poster, ca. 1943

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Media: Lithograph

Item 5629

Pesticide clean up in Eagle Lake, 1979

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1979 Location: Eagle Lake Media: Photographic print

Item 5639

Spruce budworm spraying, 1979

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1979 Media: Photographic print

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Designing Acadia

For one hundred years, Acadia National Park has captured the American imagination and stood as the most recognizable symbol of Maine’s important natural history and identity. This exhibit highlights Maine Memory content relating to Acadia and Mount Desert Island.

Exhibit

Northern Threads: Colonial and 19th century fur trade

A vignette in "Northern Threads: Two centuries of dress at Maine Historical Society Part 1," this fur trade mini-exhibition discusses the environmental and economic impact of the fur trade in Maine through the 19th century.

Exhibit

Walter Wyman and River Power

Walter Wyman's vision to capture the power of Maine's rivers to produce electricity led to the formation of Central Maine Power Co. and to a struggle within the state over what should happen to the power produced by the state's natural resources.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Natural Resource to Finished Product

Natural Resource to Finished Product Hallowell Granite Works stone yard, Hallowell, ca. 1895Hubbard Free Library A site between Winthrop…

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Beginnings

… traditional knowledge, language, and other natural sciences create a picture of Wabanaki life here before the arrival of Europeans.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Earning Our Keep Resources

Earning Our Keep Resources Roll over the top left corner of the paragraph with your mouse. A toolbox will appear that allows you to edit, format…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Restoring the Penobscot River
by John Banks

My role as the Director of the Department of Natural Resources for the Penobscot Indian Nation

Story

My 41 year career in Maine paper mills
by Mike Luciano

Generations of paper workers, families, immigrants, jobs in the mill, labor strikes, and changes

Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Why is Maine the Pine Tree State?

Grade Level: K-2 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students in early elementary grades a foundation for identifying the recognizable animals and natural resources of Maine. In this lesson, students will learn about and identify animals and plants significant to the state, and will identify what types of environments are best suited to different types of plant and animal life. Students will have the opportunity to put their own community wildlife into a large-scale perspective.