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Keywords: Maine Guide

Historical Items

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Item 11272

Charles Parson, Elmer Hale, Maine woods, 1900

Contributed by: Baxter State Park Date: circa 1900 Media: Photographic print

Item 14343

Walter J. Swett, Ashland

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: circa 1900 Location: Ashland Media: Photographic print

Item 10884

Street guide of Portland, 1928

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1928 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper, map

Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Field Guide to Trolley Cars

Many different types of trolley cars -- for different weather, different uses, and different locations -- were in use in Maine between 1895-1940. The "field guide" explains what each type looked like and how it was used.

Exhibit

Hunting Season

Maine's ample woods historically provided numerous game animals and birds for hunters seeking food, fur, or hides. The promotion of hunting as tourism and concerns about conservation toward the end of the nineteenth century changed the nature of hunting in Maine.

Exhibit

John Dunn, 19th Century Sportsman

John Warner Grigg Dunn was an accomplished amateur photographer, hunter, fisherman and lover of nature. On his trips to Ragged Lake and environs, he became an early innovator among amateur wildlife photographers. His photography left us with a unique record of the Moosehead Lake region in the late nineteenth century.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Early Maine Photography - Landscape Photography - Page 3 of 3

In 1853 the White Mountain guide Joseph A. Hall proposed to Abner Lowell, a Portland jeweler and mountain enthusiast, a plan for a carriage road to…

Site Page

Norcross Heritage Trust

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Guiding Services for Sport Hunters

… to Hunt or Camp in Maine can secure an Excellent Guide by addressing Joe Pierpoll, Princeton, Maine, the best Indian guide in the Schoodic waters.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Co-founding Halcyon Yarn and learning to weave
by Hector Jaeger

Moving to Maine, Halcyon Yarn, and rediscovering the joy of weaving

Story

How Mom caught Dad
by Jane E. Woodman

How Ruth and Piney met in Wilton and started a life together

Story

Baxter State Park and Burton W. Howe
by Jason Howe

Formation of Baxter State Park and the involvement of Burton W. Howe of Patten

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

My Lost Youth: Longfellow's Portland, Then and Now

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow loved his boyhood home of Portland, Maine. Born on Fore Street, the family moved to his maternal grandparents' home on Congress Street when Henry was eight months old. While he would go on to Bowdoin College and travel extensively abroad, ultimately living most of his adult years in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he never forgot his beloved Portland. Years after his childhood, in 1855, he wrote "My Lost Youth" about his undiminished love for and memories of growing up in Portland. This exhibit, using the poem as its focus, will present the Portland of Longfellow's boyhood. In many cases the old photos will be followed by contemporary images of what that site looked like 2004. Following the exhibit of 68 slides are five suggested lessons that can be adapted for any grade level, 3–12.

Lesson Plan

Integration of Longfellow's Poetry into American Studies

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
We explored Longfellow's ability to express universality of human emotions/experiences while also looking at the patterns he articulated in history that are applicable well beyond his era. We attempted to link a number of Longfellow's poems with different eras in U.S. History and accompanying literature, so that the poems complemented the various units. With each poem, we want to explore the question: What is American identity?