Search Results

Keywords: Maine Central

Historical Items

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Item 80447

Maine Central Institute Class of 1890, Pittsfield

Contributed by: Maine Central Institute Date: 1890 Location: Pittsfield Media: Photographic print

Item 81385

Maine Central Institute Recruitment Pamphlet, ca. 1905

Contributed by: Maine Central Institute Date: circa 1905 Location: Pittsfield Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 104209

Central Maine Fair flyer, Waterville, 1921

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1921 Location: Waterville Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Tax Records

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Item 86151

Central Wharf, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Central Wharf Proprietors

Item 86154

Storage, Central Wharf, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Central Wharf Proprietors Use: Storage

Item 86155

Storage, Central Wharf, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Central Wharf Proprietors Use: Storage

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Canning: A Maine Industry

Maine's corn canning industry, as illuminated by the career of George S. Jewett, prospered between 1850 and 1950.

Exhibit

Making Paper, Making Maine

Paper has shaped Maine's economy, molded individual and community identities, and impacted the environment throughout Maine. When Hugh Chisholm opened the Otis Falls Pulp Company in Jay in 1888, the mill was one of the most modern paper-making facilities in the country, and was connected to national and global markets. For the next century, Maine was an international leader in the manufacture of pulp and paper.

Exhibit

State of Mind: Becoming Maine

The history of the region now known as Maine did not begin at statehood in 1820. What was Maine before it was a state? How did Maine separate from Massachusetts? How has the Maine we experience today been shaped by thousands of years of history?

Site Pages

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Site Page

Early Maine Photography - Human Interest

… to Mary, Lucia, and Lizzie, three friends in the Central Maine town of Palmyra. Baker’s poignant inscription in pencil reads: "May 11, 1855…

Site Page

Early Maine Photography - The Vickery-Shettleworth Collection

… promise, and his parents sent him to the Maine Central Institute in Pittsfield, followed by Bates College, from which he graduated in 1940.

Site Page

Early Maine Photography - War - Page 2 of 2

This young soldier from Central Maine fought in such notable battles as First Bull Run, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville before…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Reverend Thomas Smith of First Parish Portland
by Kristina Minister, Ph.D.

Pastor, Physician, Real Estate Speculator, and Agent for Wabanaki Genocide

Story

How the first chapter Veterans for Peace was founded in Maine
by Doug Rawlings

Veterans for Peace was founded in Maine and is now an international movement

Story

Rug Hooking Project with a Story
by Marilyn Weymouth Seguin

My grandmother taught me the Maine craft of rug hooking when I was a child.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Integration of Longfellow's Poetry into American Studies

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
We explored Longfellow's ability to express universality of human emotions/experiences while also looking at the patterns he articulated in history that are applicable well beyond his era. We attempted to link a number of Longfellow's poems with different eras in U.S. History and accompanying literature, so that the poems complemented the various units. With each poem, we want to explore the question: What is American identity?