Search Results

Keywords: Locomotives

Historical Items

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Item 14811

Bangor and Aroostook engine 100, 1929

Contributed by: Oakfield Historical Society Date: 1929 Media: Photographic print

Item 5939

The Geo. J. Magee steam locomotive, 1875

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1875 Media: Albumen print

Item 5921

The Presumpscot, ca. 1870

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1870 Location: Portland Media: Albumen print

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

J.A. Poor and the Portland-Montreal Connection

John A. Poor's determination in 1845 to bring rail service to Maine and to make Portland the winter port for Montreal, along with the steel foundry he started to build locomotives and many other products, helped boost the economy of Portland the state.

Exhibit

A Field Guide to Trolley Cars

Many different types of trolley cars -- for different weather, different uses, and different locations -- were in use in Maine between 1895-1940. The "field guide" explains what each type looked like and how it was used.

Exhibit

History in Motion: The Era of the Electric Railways

Street railways, whether horse-drawn or electric, required the building of trestles and tracks. The new form of transportation aided industry, workers, vacationers, and other travelers.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Early Railroads in Bangor - Page 1 of 2

The first locomotive was the “Pioneer”. The line transported laths, shingles, clapboards, and lumber in addition to passengers.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Industry at the Mouth of the Vaughan Stream

The car was powered by a small, locomotive engine. They drove it to Augusta and back to the McClench Machine Shop in Hallowell to be dismantled and…

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - The Railroad Station

… operated from 1909 to 1927, could also carry locomotives. With the opening of the Carlton Bridge in 1927, train ferries were no longer needed.