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Keywords: Ku Klux Klan

Historical Items

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Item 23289

Women of the Ku Klux Klan seal, Houlton, ca. 1924

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: circa 1924 Location: Houlton Media: Paper

Item 23286

Ku Klux Klan Constitution cover, 1921

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: 1921 Location: Houlton Media: Ink on paper, map

  view a full transcription

Item 66676

Ku Klux Klan march, Island Falls, 1924

Contributed by: Cary Library Date: 1924-07-12 Location: Island Falls; Houlton Media: Photographic print

Tax Records

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Item 54642

509 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Joseph R. Rollins et als Use: Club House

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

The Nativist Klan

In Maine, like many other states, a newly formed Ku Klux Klan organization began recruiting members in the years just before the United States entered World War I. A message of patriotism and cautions about immigrants and non-Protestants drew many thousands of members into the secret organization in the early 1920s. By the end of the decade, the group was largely gone from Maine.

Exhibit

A Convenient Soldier: The Black Guards of Maine

The Black Guards were African American Army soldiers, members of the segregated Second Battalion of the 366th Infantry sent to guard the railways of Maine during World War II, from 1941 to 1945. The purpose of the Black Guards' deployment to Maine was to prevent terrorist attacks along the railways, and to keep Maine citizens safe during the war.

Exhibit

"Twenty Nationalities, But All Americans"

Concern about immigrants and their loyalty in the post World War I era led to programs to "Americanize" them -- an effort to help them learn English and otherwise adjust to life in the United States. Clara Soule ran one such program for the Portland Public Schools, hoping it would help the immigrants be accepted.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Portland Press Herald Glass Negative Collection - "Twenty Nationalities, But All Americans"

… Portland city government and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan were motivated by anti-immigrant sentiments.

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - VII. Flow and ebb: the effects of industrial peak & global upheaval (1900-1955) - Page 3 of 3

One of the most famous legends of Biddeford is when the Klan paraded through Saco and tried to come to Biddeford--the story goes that the Irish…

Site Page

Portland Press Herald Glass Negative Collection - Crime & Disaster - Page 1 of 2

Crime & Disaster Crime & Disaster A selection of photographs relating to crime & disaster in the Portland Press Herald Glass Plate Negative…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Alice Bertrand shares highlights from her 100+ years
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

What is it like to live through all the events that have occurred in the past 100+ years?

Story

Anti-immigrant violence
by Matthew Jude Barker

Prejudice in Maine against immigrants dates back to at least the mid-1700s

Story

Where are the French?
by Rhea Côté Robbins

Franco-Americans in Maine