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Keywords: Invitations

Historical Items

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Item 101436

Invitation to masquerade dance, Bangor, 1870

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society and Maine State Museum Date: 1870-03-22 Location: Bangor Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 54193

Synagogue tea invitation, Portland, 1948

Contributed by: Congregation Shaarey Tphiloh Date: 1948-11-15 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 12333

Mr. & Mrs. Cyrus Purinton's 50th Anniversary Invitation

Contributed by: Pejepscot Historical Society Date: 1835 - 1885 Location: Topsham Media: Paper

Exhibits

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Exhibit

How Sweet It Is

Desserts have always been a special treat. For centuries, Mainers have enjoyed something sweet as a nice conclusion to a meal or celebrate a special occasion. But many things have changed over the years: how cooks learn to make desserts, what foods and tools were available, what was important to people.

Exhibit

Student Exhibit: Rebecca Sophie Clarke

Sophie May, whose real name was Rebecca Clarke, was the author of over 40 books between 1861 and 1903. She wrote the "Little Prudy Series" based on the little town of Norridgewock.

Exhibit

The Advent of Green Acre Baha'i School

The Green Acre Baha’i School began as Green Acre Conferences, established by Sarah Jane Farmer in Eliot. She later became part of the Baha'i Faith and hosted speakers and programs that promoted peace. In 1912, the leader of the Baha'i Faith, 'Abdu'l-Baha, visited Green Acre, where hundreds saw him speak.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Invitation, Farmington, 1903

Invitation, Farmington, 1903 Contributed by Farmington Public Library Description Printed and mailed invitation to the ceremonies…

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Exhibits

We invite you to take a look and you will see all the hard work and long hours that went into creating these projects.

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Thursday Club

Thursday Club Invitation to Thursday Club's Colonial Tea Party, Biddeford, 1896 Item 31223 infoMcArthur Public Library The Club produced…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Apple Time - a visit to the ancestral farm
by Randy Randall

Memories from childhood of visiting the family homestead in Limington during apple picking time.

Story

Langdon Burton and the Cold, Wet Tourists
by Phil Tedrick

A father and son have their vacation experience totally changed by an encounter with a fisherman

Story

Vietnam Memoirs
by David Chessey

MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCES AND MY OBSERVATION OF NATIONWIDE OPINIONS CONCERNING THE “VIET NAM" WAR

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow: An American Studies Approach for Middle School

Grade Level: 6-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was truly a man of his time and of his nation; this native of Portland, Maine and graduate of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine became an American icon. Lines from his poems intersperse our daily speech and the characters of his long narrative poems have become part of American myth. Longfellow's fame was international; scholars, politicians, heads-of-state and everyday people read and memorized his poems. Our goal is to show that just as Longfellow reacted to and participated in his times, so his poetry participated in shaping and defining American culture and literature. The following unit plan introduces and demonstrates an American Studies approach to the life and work of Longfellow. Because the collaborative work that forms the basis for this unit was partially responsible for leading the two of us to complete the American & New England Studies Masters program at University of Southern Maine, we returned there for a working definition of "American Studies approach" as it applies to the grade level classroom. Joe Conforti, who was director at the time we both went through the program, offered some useful clarifying comments and explanation. He reminded us that such a focus provides a holistic approach to the life and work of an author. It sets a work of literature in a broad cultural and historical context as well as in the context of the poet's life. The aim of an American Studies approach is to "broaden the context of a work to illuminate the American past" (Conforti) for your students. We have found this approach to have multiple benefits at the classroom and research level. It brings the poems and the poet alive for students and connects with other curricular work, especially social studies. When linked with a Maine history unit, it helps to place Portland and Maine in an historical and cultural context. It also provides an inviting atmosphere for the in-depth study of the mechanics of Longfellow's poetry. What follows is a set of lesson plans that form a unit of study. The biographical "anchor" that we have used for this unit is an out-of-print biography An American Bard: The story of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, by Ruth Langland Holberg, Thomas Y. Crowell & Company, c1963. Permission has been requested to make this work available as a downloadable file off this web page, but in the meantime, used copies are readily and cheaply available from various vendors. The poem we have chosen to demonstrate our approach is "Paul Revere's Ride." The worksheets were developed by Judy Donahue, the explanatory essays researched and written by the two of us, and our sources are cited below. We have also included a list of helpful links. When possible we have included helpful material in text format, or have supplied site links. Our complete unit includes other Longfellow poems with the same approach, but in the interest of time and space, they are not included. Please feel free to contact us with questions and comments.