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Keywords: Industries

Historical Items

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Item 31034

Guilford Industries on Water Street, 1946

Contributed by: Guilford Historical Society Date: 1946 Location: Guilford Media: Photographic print

Item 8639

Locomotive, Wiscasset engine house, 1931

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Location: Wiscasset; Portland; Wiscasset; Portland Media: Photoprint

Item 8600

Stock tank for S.D. Warren Paper Company

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1880 Location: Portland; Westbrook Media: Photoprint

Tax Records

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Item 38982

622-624 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Consolidated Industries, Inc. Use: Apartments & Stores

Item 38985

626-628 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Consolidated Industries, Inc. Use: Apartments & Stores

Item 35778

48 Brown Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Consolidated Industries Inc. Use: Rooming House

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Canning: A Maine Industry

Maine's corn canning industry, as illuminated by the career of George S. Jewett, prospered between 1850 and 1950.

Exhibit

Biddeford, Saco and the Textile Industry

The largest textile factory in the country reached seven stories up on the banks of the Saco River in 1825, ushering in more than a century of making cloth in Biddeford and Saco. Along with the industry came larger populations and commercial, retail, social, and cultural growth.

Exhibit

In Time and Eternity: Shakers in the Industrial Age

"In Time and Eternity: Maine Shakers in the Industrial Age 1872-1918" is a series of images that depict in detail the Shakers in Maine during a little explored time period of expansion and change.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Industrial Technology

Industrial Technology Sydney Gross, Alex Landry, Alex Guiou, Sydney Perry & Maggie Pomerleau Cotton Mill, Academy Street, Hallowell, ca.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Industrial Recources

Industrial Recources Grant Bowen's Interwiew with Captain Aurthur Moore, Harbor Master  In earlier days, ships were made of wood, but later were…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Industry on Bombahook

Industry on Bombahook There are several theories as to how Bombahook Stream got its name. Birds eye view map, Hallowell, 1878 Bombahook is the…

My Maine Stories

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Story

My Paper Industry career and setting up a museum
by Sherry Judd

I worked in and around the Paper Industry all my life. Now I run Maine's Paper and Heritage Museum.

Story

If you wanted a good job, the mill was the place to be.
by Brent Gay

Changes in the paper industry, labor strikes, and the community around International Paper's mills

Story

My 40 years in Forestry and the Paper Industry in Maine
by Donna Cassese

I was the first female forester hired by Scott Paper and continue to find new uses for wood.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Primary Sources: The Maine Shipyard

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will give students a close-up look at historical operations behind Maine's famed shipbuilding and shipping industries. Students will examine primary sources including letters, bills of lading, images, and objects, and draw informed hypotheses about the evolution of the seafaring industry and its impact on Maine’s communities over time.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow's "The Village Blacksmith" and "Whitman's Song of Myself" - Alternative Constructions of the American Worker

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Most if not all of us have or will need to work in the American marketplace for at least six decades of our lives. There's a saying that I remember a superintendent telling a group of graduating high-school seniors: remember, when you are on your deathbed, you will not be saying that you wish you had spent more time "at the office." But Americans do spend a lot more time working each year than nearly any other people on the planet. By the end of our careers, many of us will have spent more time with our co-workers than with our families. Already in the 21st century, much has been written about the "Wal-Martization" of the American workplace, about how, despite rocketing profits, corporations such as Wal-Mart overwork and underpay their employees, how workers' wages have remained stagnant since the 1970s, while the costs of college education and health insurance have risen out of reach for many citizens. It's become a cliché to say that the gap between the "haves" and the "have nots" is widening to an alarming degree. In his book Wealth and Democracy, Kevin Phillips says we are dangerously close to becoming a plutocracy in which one dollar equals one vote. Such clashes between employers and employees, and between our rhetoric of equality of opportunity and the reality of our working lives, are not new in America. With the onset of the industrial revolution in the first half of the nineteenth century, many workers were displaced from their traditional means of employment, as the country shifted from a farm-based, agrarian economy toward an urban, manufacturing-centered one. In cities such as New York, groups of "workingmen" (early manifestations of unions) protested, sometimes violently, unsatisfactory labor conditions. Labor unions remain a controversial political presence in America today. Longfellow and Whitman both wrote with sympathy about the American worker, although their respective portraits are strikingly different, and worth juxtaposing. Longfellow's poem "The Village Blacksmith" is one of his most famous and beloved visions: in this poem, one blacksmith epitomizes characteristics and values which many of Longfellow's readers, then and now, revere as "American" traits. Whitman's canto (a section of a long poem) 15 from "Song of Myself," however, presents many different "identities" of the American worker, representing the entire social spectrum, from the crew of a fish smack to the president (I must add that Whitman's entire "Song of Myself" is actually 52 cantos in length). I do not pretend to offer these single texts as all-encompassing of the respective poets' ideas about workers, but these poems offer a starting place for comparison and contrast. We know that Longfellow was the most popular American poet of the nineteenth century, just as we know that Whitman came to be one of the most controversial. Read more widely in the work of both poets and decide for yourselves which poet speaks to you more meaningfully and why.