Search Results

Keywords: Historic sites

Historical Items

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Item 31422

Scarborough Historical Society and Museum Building, ca. 1964

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum Date: circa 1964 Location: Scarborough Media: Photographic print

Item 98592

Dixfield Historical Society sketch, Dixfield, ca. 2003

Contributed by: Dixfield Historical Society Date: circa 1993 Location: Dixfield Media: Ink on paper

Item 15966

Dining Room, Vassall-Craigie-Longfellow House, Cambridge, ca. 1910

Contributed by: NPS, Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site Date: circa 1910 Location: Cambridge Media: Wood

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 110491

Sculpture garden at Cape Ann Historical Museum, Gloucester, MA, 2000-2001

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 2000–2001 Location: Gloucester Client: Cape Ann Historical Museum Architect: Patrick Chasse; Landscape Design Associates

Item 109219

Proposed Memorial Building and Site, Bangor, 1947

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1947 Location: Bangor Client: unknown Architect: Eaton W. Tarbell

Item 110465

Van Vleck site, Mount Desert, ca. 2004

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 2004 Location: Mount Desert Client: Van Vleck Architect: Landscape Design Associates

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Sylvan Site: A Model Development

Frederick Wheeler Hinckley, a Portland lawyer and politician, had grand visions of a 200-home development when he began the Sylvan Site in South Portland in 1917. The stock market crash in 1929 put a halt to his plans, but by then he had built 37, no two of which were alike.

Exhibit

Northern Threads: Two centuries of dress at Maine Historical

Organized by themed vignettes, Northern Threads shares stories about Maine people, while exploring how the clothing they wore reveals social, economic, and environmental histories. This re-examination of Maine Historical Society's permanent collection is an opportunity to consider the relevance of historic clothing in museums, the ebb and flow of fashion styles, and the complexities of diverse representation spanning 200 years of collecting.

Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Acton-Shapleigh Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Farmington Historical Society

… Farmington Community Heritage site[/url] [b]Selected Farmington Historical Society images:[/b] Farmington Historical Society PO Box 575 118…

Site Page

Palmyra Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Spiros Droggitis: From Biddeford to Washington DC and back
by Biddeford Cultural & Heritage Center

A Greek family's impact: from the iconic Wonderbar Restaurant to Washington DC

Story

Harold's Garage, Rome Hollow, Maine
by Mimi C

Story about Harold Hawes, owner of Harold's garage and self-styled auctioneer in Rome Hollow, Maine

Story

History of Forest Gardens
by Gary Libby

This is a history of one of Portland's oldest local bars

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

What Remains: Learning about Maine Populations through Burial Customs

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
This lesson plan will give students an overview of how burial sites and gravestone material culture can assist historians and archaeologists in discovering information about people and migration over time. Students will learn how new scholarship can help to dispel harmful archaeological myths, look into the roles of religion and ethnicity in early Maine and New England immigrant and colonial settlements, and discover how to track changes in population and social values from the 1600s to early 1900s based on gravestone iconography and epitaphs.

Lesson Plan

Portland History: "My Lost Youth" - Longfellow's Portland, Then and Now

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow loved his boyhood home of Portland, Maine. Born on Fore Street, the family moved to his maternal grandparents' home on Congress Street when Henry was eight months old. While he would go on to Bowdoin College and travel extensively abroad, ultimately living most of his adult years in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he never forgot his beloved Portland. Years after his childhood, in 1855, he wrote "My Lost Youth" about his undiminished love for and memories of growing up in Portland. This exhibit, using the poem as its focus, will present the Portland of Longfellow's boyhood. In many cases the old photos will be followed by contemporary images of what that site looked like 2004. Following the exhibit of 68 slides are five suggested lessons that can be adapted for any grade level, 3–12.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.