Search Results

Keywords: Government documents

Historical Items

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Item 31897

Incorporation of the Pepperell Manufacturing Company, Biddeford, 1844

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1844-02-16 Location: Biddeford Media: Ink on paper

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Item 76465

Baldwin, Town Warrant March 4, 1805

Contributed by: Baldwin Historical Society Date: 1805-02-11 Location: Baldwin Media: Ink on paper

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Item 76340

Town Meeting Warrant, Baldwin, 1802

Contributed by: Baldwin Historical Society Date: 1802-08-14 Location: Baldwin Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

Unlocking the Declaration's Secrets

Fewer than 30 copies of the first printing of the Declaration of Independence are known to exist. John Dunlap hurriedly printed copies for distribution to assemblies, conventions, committees and military officers. Authenticating authenticity of the document requires examination of numerous details of the broadside.

Exhibit

State of Mind: Becoming Maine

The history of the region now known as Maine did not begin at statehood in 1820. What was Maine before it was a state? How did Maine separate from Massachusetts? How has the Maine we experience today been shaped by thousands of years of history?

Exhibit

Port of Portland's Custom House and Collectors of Customs

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage.

Site Pages

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Site Page

City of Portland Planning & Urban Development

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Maine's Road to Statehood - The Missouri Compromise: A Moral Dilemma

… 148-183 and Webb, Lee, “Maine’s Constitution: A Document Made by Men at a Specific Time.” [33] For a thorough analysis of the Missouri Compromise…

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - Old Town Hall and Grant Building

… administration, Bath received $10,000 from the government, $4,000 of which went toward building the Old City Hall.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Orphanage on Revere Street
by anonymous

An orphanage operated by a Mrs. Oliver on 54 Revere Street in Portland, Maine in 1930.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine: The Votes for Statehood

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine became a state in 1820 after separating from Massachusetts, but the call for statehood had begun long before the final vote. Why did it take so long? Was 1820 the right time? In this lesson, students will begin to place where Maine’s statehood fits into the broader narrative of 18th and 19th century American political history. They will have the opportunity to cast their own Missouri Compromise vote after learning about Maine’s long road to statehood.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.