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Keywords: French language

Historical Items

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Item 18880

Jean-Baptiste Couture, Lewiston

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection Date: circa 1900 Location: Lewiston Media: Photographic print

Item 18376

Stained glass window, Sts. Peter and Paul Church, Lewiston

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection Date: 2005 Location: Lewiston Media: Photographic print

Item 33880

"Ma Suzanne" program, Biddeford, January 1947

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1947-01-19 Location: Biddeford; Saco Media: Ink on paper

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Exhibits

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Exhibit

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Exhibit

La Basilique Lewiston

Like many cities in France, Lewiston and Auburn's skylines are dominated by a cathedral-like structure, St. Peter and Paul Church. Now designated a basilica by the Vatican, it stands as a symbol of French Catholic contributions to the State of Maine.

Exhibit

Le Théâtre

Lewiston, Maine's second largest city, was long looked upon by many as a mill town with grimy smoke stacks, crowded tenements, low-paying jobs, sleazy clubs and little by way of refinement, except for Bates College. Yet, a noted Québec historian, Robert Rumilly, described it as "the French Athens of New England."

Site Pages

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Site Page

Franco-American Collection

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Native Americans

… for example, has maintained their Maliseet language so that this region is known as the only place on earth where the Maliseet language is spoken…

Site Page

Maine's Swedish Colony, July 23, 1870 - Industry

The language and customs of three countries—Sweden, France and England—were subsequently all absorbed into the community.

My Maine Stories

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Story

How Mon-Oncle France came to Les-États
by Michael Parent

How Mon-Oncle France came to the United States.

Story

Growing up in Lewiston and running Museum L-A
by Rachel Desgrosseilliers

Growing up Franco-American and honoring our mill working heritage