Search Results

Keywords: England

Historical Items

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Item 75564

Arthur and Annah Richardson's children, England, 1927

Contributed by: Descendants of Annah Butler Richardson and Arthur Berry Richardson through Prince Memorial Library Date: circa 1927 Location: London Media: Photographic print

Item 104938

"New England the Most Remarqueable Parts Thus Named," 1637

Contributed by: Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Education Date: circa 1614 Media: Ink on Paper

Item 51996

St. Francis College, Biddeford, ca. 1955

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: circa 1955 Location: Biddeford Media: Postcard

Tax Records

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Item 54058

41-47 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: New England Telephone Company Use: Office & Telephone Exchange

Item 54059

Assessor's Record, 41-47 Forest Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: New England Telephone Company Use: Office & Telephone Exchange

Item 38170

278-280 Congress Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: New England Army Supply Use: Dwelling - Two Family and Store

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Westbrook Seminary: Educating Women

Westbrook Seminary, built on Stevens Plain in 1831, was founded to educate young men and young women. Seminaries traditionally were a form of advanced secondary education. Westbrook Seminary served an important function in admitting women students, for whom education was less available in the early and mid nineteenth century.

Exhibit

The Life and Legacy of the George Tate Family

Captain George Tate, mast agent for the King of England from 1751 to the Revolutionary War, and his descendants helped shape the development of Portland (first known as Falmouth) through activities such as commerce, shipping, and real estate.

Exhibit

Longfellow: The Man Who Invented America

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was a man and a poet of New England conscience. He was influenced by his ancestry and his Portland boyhood home and experience.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Abplanalp Library, UNE

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - Church Block

The change took place at New England Telephone & Telegraph Company. H.H Fisher was the manager of the business when the change commenced.

Site Page

Bath's Historic Downtown - The Railroad Station

… finest and most modern railroad stations in New England. During the construction of the new station, William S.

My Maine Stories

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Story

Working as a telephone operator in the 1940s
by Doris Tardy

Working as a telephone operator in 1946 was new and exciting, and challenging.

Story

The stories my parents told
by Henry Gartley

Stories from my immigrant parents, WWII, and my love of history.

Story

Coaching in Maine and how to become a good coach
by University of New England

Dr. John Winkin speaks at sports medicine lecture, introduced by Dr. Doug Brown

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Becoming Maine: The District of Maine's Coastal Economy

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce students to the maritime economy of Maine prior to statehood and to the Coasting Law that impacted the separation debate. Students will examine primary documents, take part in an activity that will put the Coasting Law in the context of late 18th century – early 19th century New England, and learn about how the Embargo Act of 1807 affected Maine in the decades leading to statehood.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

What Remains: Learning about Maine Populations through Burial Customs

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
This lesson plan will give students an overview of how burial sites and gravestone material culture can assist historians and archaeologists in discovering information about people and migration over time. Students will learn how new scholarship can help to dispel harmful archaeological myths, look into the roles of religion and ethnicity in early Maine and New England immigrant and colonial settlements, and discover how to track changes in population and social values from the 1600s to early 1900s based on gravestone iconography and epitaphs.