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Keywords: Driving

Historical Items

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Item 8413

Driving crew, Pleasant River

Contributed by: Patten Lumbermen's Museum Date: circa 1900 Media: Photographic print

Item 34358

Log Drive, Androscoggin River, Turner, ca. 1890

Contributed by: Turner Museum and Historical Society Date: circa 1890 Location: Turner Media: Photographic print

Item 9791

Logs On A River, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1900 Media: Photographic print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Student Exhibit: Logging on Kennebec River

I became interested in the Kennebec River log drive when my grandfather would tell me stories. He remembers watching the logs flow down the river from his home in Fairfield, a small town along the Kennebec River.

Exhibit

Moosehead Steamboats

After the canoe, steamboats became the favored method of transportation on Moosehead Lake. They revolutionized movement of logs and helped promote tourism in the region.

Exhibit

Good Will-Hinckley: Building a Landscape

The landscape at the Good Will-Hinckley campus in Fairfield was designed to help educate and influence the orphans and other needy children at the school and home.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Kennebec River Log Drive

Kennebec River Log Drive by Michael Hoy Log driving began in Maine on the Saco river in the 18th century.

Site Page

Guilford, Maine - EVENTS - Page 3 of 3

EVENTS Log Drives (Text pending) Hardwood Products, Guilford, ca. 1930Item Contributed byGuilford Historical Society Annual River Drive

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Maine Granite Industry-Hall Quarry

… The work was done by hand with tools like this plug hammer used to drive wedges between the "half rounds" that would split the granite.

My Maine Stories

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Story

How Belfast was the Chicken Capital of the Northeast
by Ralph Chavis

My memories of spending time in Belfast as a child when my father worked in the chicken industry.

Story

My education and work at THE Mercy
by Judy Harmon

Judy Harmon discussed X-Ray School, changing technology, and her 1960s jeep

Story

A Smart Horse
by Lynn Peasley Sanborn

The horse brings the hay home while the boys are swimming.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between Maine (and the United States) and the Wabanaki peoples living within the drawn boundaries of the state over the last 400 years. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by looking at colonial treaties and proclamations, and legislative acts in the 20th and 21st centuries including the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act and the 21st century legal cases that the act spurred.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Birth of An American Hero in "Paul Revere's Ride"

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
The period of American history just prior to the Civil War required a mythology that would celebrate the strength of the individual, while fostering a sense of Nationalism. Longfellow saw Nationalism as a driving force, particularly important during this period and set out in his poem, "Paul Revere's Ride" to arm the people with the necessary ideology to face the oncoming hardships. "Paul Revere's Ride" was perfectly suited for such an age and is responsible for embedding in the American consciousness a sense of the cultural identity that was born during this defining period in American History. It is Longfellow's interpretation and not the actual event that became what Dana Gioia terms "a timeless emblem of American courage and independence." Gioia credits the poem's perseverance to the ease of the poem's presentation and subject matter. "Paul Revere's Ride" takes a complicated historical incident embedded in the politics of Revolutionary America and retells it with narrative clarity, emotional power, and masterful pacing,"(2). Although there have been several movements to debunk "Paul Revere's Ride," due to its lack of historical accuracy, the poem has remained very much alive in our national consciousness. Warren Harding, president during the fashionable reign of debunk criticism, perhaps said it best when he remarked, "An iconoclastic American said there never was a ride by Paul Revere. Somebody made the ride, and stirred the minutemen in the colonies to fight the battle of Lexington, which was the beginning of independence in the new Republic of America. I love the story of Paul Revere, whether he rode or not" (Fischer 337). Thus, "despite every well-intentioned effort to correct it historically, Revere's story is for all practical purposes the one Longfellow created for him," (Calhoun 261). It was what Paul Revere's Ride came to symbolize that was important, not the actual details of the ride itself.